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Full text of "A Sketch of the life and a list of some of the works of John Singleton Copley"

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John Singleton Copley 

After portrait by Gainsborough 



0^ 






SKETCH OF THE LIFE 



LIST OF SOME OF THE WORKS 



OF 



JOHN SINGLETON COPLEY. 



BV 

FRANK W. BAYLEY 



COPLEY GALLERY 
BOSTON, MASS. 



BOSTON 

Zbe 0arDen lpress 

WILLIAM B. LIBBY, 227 TREMONT STREET 
1910 



Preface 



The author of this memoir is an admirer of the work of 
John Singleton Copley and has for many years been familiar 
with his pictures. In the collection of the data, the basis of 
effort was the admirable work performed by the late Augustus 
Thorndike Perkins and published privately by him in 1873, 
and the author freely admits that his compilation of Copley's 
pictures has only been made possible by Mr. Perkins' efforts. 
The author desires to acknowledge his indebtedness to the many 
owners of Copley portraits who have allowed him to see them 
and who have assisted in correctly recording them. 



John Singleton Copley 



John Singleton Copley was the son of Richard Copley of 
County Limerick, Ireland, and Mary Singleton of County Clare, 
Ireland, descending from the Lancashire family of that name. 

Richard and his wife arrived in Boston in 1736 and the future 
artist was born July 3, 1737, the father dying on a trip to the 
West Indies soon after John was born. In 1748, according to 
the records of Trinity Church, Mrs. Copley was married to 
Peter Pelham when the son John was eleven years of age. Mr. 
Pelham was a widower having three sons by his first wife, Peter, 
Charles, and William; by his second wife, Henry, whose por- 
trait, as the "Boy with the Squirrel," is owned by Mr. Frederic 
Amory. Mr. Pelham was, considering the times, a man of 
good education, a passable painter and a good engraver, besides 
being a surveyor and mathematician. He most probably 
taught his step-son the rudiments of his art. When but fifteen 
years of age Copley painted a portrait of his step-brother 
Charles, now owned by Mr. Charles Pelham Curtis. This 
picture is most interesting as showing the early tendency of 
the young artist. In 1753, at the a S e °f sixteen, he painted the 
portrait of Rev. William Welsteed, now in the Massachusetts 
Historical Society, and in the same year he painted the portrait 
of Dr. De Mountfort, now owned in Detroit, Mich., which is 
well drawn and very excellent in color. 

In 1754 he painted the allegorical picture Mars, Venus and 
Vulcan, now in the Boston Art Museum. It measures thirty 



6 John Singleton Copley 

inches by twenty-five inches. Vulcan seems engaged in making 
darts, one of which Venus throws at Mars. The picture is 
signed and dated 1754. 

In 1755 Major George Washington visited Boston to relate 
to Governor Shirley the circumstances attending his son's death 
at the battle of Monongahela. While in Boston he sat to Mr. 
Copley for a miniature which, after remaining in the Washing- 
ton family, came into the possession of Washington Irving and 
then to the late George P. Putnam, the well-known publisher. 

In 1769 Copley married Susannah Farnum, daughter of Rich- 
ard Clarke, a wealthy merchant of Boston, and agent of the East 
India Company. We constantly meet her familiar lineaments 
in Copley's works. Mary in "The Nativity," again in "The 
Family Picture," and in the "Venus and Cupid," or in the female 
group in "The Death of Major Pierson." 

In 1 77 1 Copley wrote that he was earning a comfortable in- 
come. At this time he moved in the best society, where his 
courtly manners and genial disposition made him a general 
favorite. He was now approaching the crucial period of his 
life. He saw the approaching storm that was soon to break 
and deluge his country in blood. He was peculiarly situated 
and in a trying position. It is said that his sympathies were 
at first with the Revolutionists, and he acted as an interme- 
diary between them and his father-in-law, Richard Clarke, 
to whom the tea was consigned, but when the infuriated mob 
destroyed the tea and attacked the warehouse and residence of 
Mr. Clarke, forcing him to flee for his life, Copley could no 
longer tolerate mob rule. His case was like that of many others 
of whom it is said "persecution made half of the king's friends." 
These outrages occurred in December, 1773. Less than two 
years afterward he wrote to his wife, from Italy, July, 1775: 



John Singleton Copley 7 

" You know years ago I was right in my opinion that this would 
be the result of the attempt to tax the colony; it is now my set- 
tled conviction that all the power of Great Britain will not reduce 
them to obedience. Unhappy and miserable people, once the 
happiest, now the most wretched. How warmly I expostulated 
with some of the violent 'Sons of Liberty' against their pro- 
ceedings, they must remember; and with how little judgment, 
in their opinion, did I then seem to speak! But all this is past; 
the day of tribulation is come, and years of sorrow will not dry 
the orphan's tears nor stop the widow's lamentations, the ground 
will be deluged in the blood of its inhabitants before peace will 
again assume its dominion in that country." 

HIS ARTISTIC SUCCESS IN ENGLAND. 

Copley embarked for England, June, 1774, six months after 
his father-in-law was driven out of Boston by the mob, and one 
year before the conflict with the mother country commenced. 
Leaving his aged mother, his favorite brother, his wife and 
children behind him, he went to prepare a place of refuge for, 
them from the impending storm. Probably the desire to visit 
Europe and behold the work of the great masters of the art he 
loved so well had something to do with leaving his native land, 
to which he was never to return. After travelling and studying 
two years on the Continent, he went back to London and was 
soon joined by his family. Then began a career of uninter- 
rupted success. He became the fashion, and many of the no- 
bility sat to him as did also three of the princesses, daughters of 
George III. Following the fashion of the day he took up his- 
torical painting, which included the death of Major Pierson and 
the death of Chatham (both now in the English National Gal- 
lery) ; The Seige of Gibraltar, now in the Guild Hall of London, 



8 John Singleton Copley 

and Charles I. demanding in the House of Commons the sur- 
render of the five impeached members, which now hangs in the 
Boston Public Library. "The death of Major Pierson" in 
repelling the attack of the French at St. Helier's, Jersey, on the 
sixth of January, 1781, was painted in, 1783 for Alderman 
Boydell for his gallery. When this was dispersed it was brought 
back by Copley, and remained in the house in George Street 
until Lord Lyndhurst's death, when it was purchased for the 
National Gallery for 1500 guineas. The woman flying from 
the crowd in terror, with the child in her arms, was painted from 
the nurse of Mr. Copley's family; the figure between her and 
the wall, with the upraised arm, is Mrs. Copley; the boy running 
by the nurse's side is young Copley. 

Copley was an addressor of Hutchinson in 1774, the year he 
left Boston, and in 1776, on his return from Italy to London, 
he became a member of the Loyalist Club, for weekly conver- 
sation and a dinner. He died at his residence in George Street, 
London, September, 181 5, aged seventy-eight, and was buried 
, in the tomb belonging to Governor Hutchinson's family in the 
parish church at Croyden, near London. Copley had one son 
and two daughters who lived to maturity. 



The Following List of Pictures 

WHILE FAIRLY COMPLETE, DOES NOT CONTAIN ALL, AND YET THE 

AUTHOR FEELS CONFIDENT A LARGE MAJORITY OF COPLEY'S 

WORK IS HERE RECORDED. 



John Adams 

This portrait of Washington's immediate successor is full 
length, painted in London in the latter part of the year 1783. 
It is now in the possession of Harvard College. He is attired 
in a brown velvet court dress, standing by a table, underneath 
which is a globe. 

John Adams 

This is the portrait of a distinguished merchant, the son of 
Rev. Hugh Adams, his wife being Susannah Parker. The 
picture is half length life size and represents him as dressed in 
a brown coat, a richly embroidered satin waistcoat, and a full 
wig. He stands with his right hand resting on his hip, while 
his left is thrust into his waistcoat. A background with the 
sea and ships in the distance. It belongs to Mr. George B. 
Dorr of Boston. 

Mrs. John Adams 

Wife of John Adams, the eminent merchant of Boston is a 
companion picture to that of her husband. Her left hand lies 
in an easy position while her right is concealed by her dress. 
She is dressed in a blue robe, cut low in the neck, and her hair 
is dark. The background is a landscape. It belongs to Mr. 
George B. Dorr of Boston. 



io John Singleton Copley 

John Quincy Adams 

This beautiful portrait belongs to Hon. Chas. Francis Adams 
and was painted while Mr. Adams was United States Minister 
at the Hague in 1795. It was presented by the artist to Mr. 
and Mrs. John Adams. A fine example of Copley's work at 
his best period. It hangs in the Boston Art Museum. 

Samuel Adams 

This picture is of three-quarters length. He is standing by 
a table, holding a paper in his hand. The dress is a brown 
coat. It is a very spirited and fine example of Copley's work. 
Governor Samuel Adams was born in Boston, in 1722. Grad- 
uated at Harvard University in 1740. Elected representative 
to the Assembly in 1765. He married Elizabeth, daughter of 
the Rev. Samuel Checkley, in 1749. In 1775 he was proscribed 
by the British Government. In 1781 he was president of the 
Massachusetts Senate. In 1789 chosen Lieutenant-Governor 
and Governor from 1794 to 1797. His enthusiastic support 
of the Revolution is surpassed by none. Samuel Adams died 
in 1803. It is in the Boston Art Museum. A second picture 
of Mr. Adams in Copley's latest style is in possession of 
Harvard College. It is a smaller picture measuring twelve by 
sixteen inches. 

Rev. Nathaniel Appleton 

Was born in 1693, died in 1784. He is dressed in clerical 
robes and bands, and is represented as sitting in a chair, and 
holding in his hand a book. This picture was painted in 1764. 
It is in the possession of Harvard College. 



John Singleton Copley n 

Mrs. Nathaniel Appleton 

Wife of Rev. Nathaniel Appleton, whose maiden name was 
Margaret Gibbs, was born in 1701 and died in 1771. The 
dress is a black basque with a skirt of grey silk. The right 
elbow rests upon a table with the hand supporting the face. It 
is a half-length picture, and is in the possession of Harvard 
College. 

Nathaniel Allen 

Was a grandson of Joseph Allen, who came to Gloucester in 
1674. This portrait is of three-fourths length. He is dressed 
in a brown suit of the times, and is seated at a table, his left 
arm resting on a book, and holding a letter in his hand. The 
whole picture is beautifully painted. It is in the possession 
of Charles S. Sargent of Brookline. 

Mrs. Nathaniel Allen 

Her maiden name was Sarah, daughter of Col. Epes Sargent. 
She was born in 1792. She is represented as standing, and wear- 
ing a large hat. She is dressed in a steel colored silk, and is 
drawing on her glove. It is three-fourths length, and in Cop- 
ley's late manner. It is in the possession of Charles S. Sargent 
of Brookline. 

James Allen 

Was born in 1739, and was quite distinguished as a poet. He 
wrote the well-known lines on "The Boston Massacre," and 
many other pieces. It was thought by those conversant in 
the matter, that had he not been a man of large fortune and 
easy disposition, he would have risen to great eminence. He 
died in 1808. This picture, which is in the possession of the 



12 John Singleton Copley 

Massachusetts Historical Society, is a half length, and repre- 
sents a young man with dark eyes and hair, dressed in a brown 
coat and waistcoat with gold buttons, and a black silk necker- 
chief. 

Thomas Amory 

Was born in 1700, and married a Miss Holmes. He died 
May 1, 1770. This portrait is drawn in colored crayons, only 
giving the head and shoulders. The features are full and 
rather regular, with a beautifully fresh and light complexion. 
The dress is a greenish blue robe, with a full, curling wig. The 
picture is in the possession of his descendant, Miss Codman, 
Bristol, R. I. There was another portrait of this Mr. Amory, 
a crayon also, which was destroyed by fire. In this the dress 
was a blue silk robe and full wig. 

Mrs. Amory 

Born in 1740, and died in 1823. She was the wife of Thomas 
Amory. The dress is of blue silk, cut low in the neck, with a 
lace tucker. The picture is of half size, and is curious as the 
last one painted before Copley left Boston, and not being fin- 
ished, payment was never asked nor rendered; so says the 
tradition. It is in the possession of W. D. Sohier of Boston. 

John Amory, Senior 

Was a merchant, and a son of Thomas Amory; born August 
29, 1728, died June 5, 1803. He married, January 16, 1757, 
Katherine Greene. This portrait is of three-fourths length. 
He is standing with one hand resting on the back of a chair, 
the right hand holding an open letter. The color of the picture 
is now of a subdued richness, and represents the dress as being 



John Singleton Copley 13 

a goldlaced brown velvet coat, and small clothes. Beyond are 
drapery, sky, the sea, and a ship. It is in the possession of 
his descendant, Miss Martha Codman, Washington, D. C. 

Mrs. Katherine Amory 

Wife of John Amory, a daughter of Rufus and Katherine 
Greene. She was born November 22, 1731, and died April 11, 
1777, in London. This picture is chiefly composed of browns 
and yellows, the dress being yellow silk or satin. The drawing 
of one of the hands is poor. In a strong light may be seen a 
little negro boy beneath a table. The picture is in the possession 
of Mr. George A. Goddard of Boston. 

Thomas Amory 

Was born in 1722, died in 1784. This portrait is in oil, of 
three-fourths length. He is dressed in a brown coat, and leans 
upon a staff, holding a glove in his hand. It is in the posses- 
sion of Mr. Arthur Amory, of Boston. 

Rev. East Apthorp 

Rector of the Epicsopal Church in Cambridge. This picture 
was in the possession of a Miss Dexter, of Philadelphia, Pa. 

Captain Apthrop 

An officer of the British Navy. This is a crayon of half size. 
It was in the possession of Miss Ann Apthorp, Jamaica Plain. 



14 John Singleton Copley 

Mrs. John Apthorp 

Was Hannah, daughter of Sheriff Stephen Greenleaf and 
Mary Greenleaf, his wife. She was married in 1765. This 
picture is of oval form, and of half length, representing a young 
lady dressed in a blue silk, edged round the neck with white 
lace. She has also a pink scarf, fastened at the waist by a pearl 
pin. The face is rather in profile. Round her neck she has a 
collar of three rows of pearls, tied behind with a blue bow. Her 
dark hair, without powder, is drawn back from her face, and 
dressed with pearls, and with three small flowers on the top. 
The portrait is in the possession of Mrs. William F. Apthorp, 
of Boston. 

John Andrews 

Some of his letters have been published by the Massachusetts 
Historical Society. This is a crayon drawing, one-quarter 
length, representing the subject when he was twenty-eight years 
of age, and is in a fine state of preservation. It was in the pos- 
session of his son, the Rev. George B. Andrews, High wood. 

The Ascension of Christ 

Copley made a drawing of this subject while he was in Rome 
in 1774 and later a painting in England. The painting is in 
the possession of Mrs. Gordon Dexter. 

Col. Thaddeus Burr 

Of Topsfield, Ct. A picture of two-thirds length. He was 
a distinguished gentleman of his times. As the last sitting was 
taken just before a dinner with John Hancock, we have a repre- 
sentation of the dress appropriate to such an occasion, which 



John Singleton Copley 15 

consists of a brown suit, a blue satin waistcoat with silver but- 
tons, and with ruffles at the neck and wrists. It belongs to 
Mrs. H. S. Knapp, of New York. 

Mrs. Eunice Burr 

Wife of Col. Thaddeus Burr, was a Miss Dennie, of Boston. 
Like the portrait of her husband, it is of two-thirds length; the 
dress being pink damask, open in front, showing a petticoat of 
white satin, trimmed with silver lace. There is white lace on 
the sleeves and at the neck. It belongs to Mrs. H. S. Knapp, 
of New York. 

General William Brattle 

Was born in 1702, graduated at Harvard College in 1722, 
and died in 1776. He is represented in full uniform as a major- 
general. The picture is signed John Singleton Copley, 1756, 
Copley being at that time under twenty years of age. It is in 
the possession of Miss M. C. Appleton, of Boston. 

Rev. Arthur Browne 

A half-length life-size portrait, representing a clergyman of 
the Church of England in his black silk robes and bands. He 
was born in England, and was a missionary to this country, and 
the first Rector of St. John's Church, Portsmouth. His pas- 
torate continued for thirty-seven years. He was distinguished 
for his learning and piety; and his fine countenance shows him 
to have been a man of powerful intellect. It is in the General 
Theological Library, Boston. 



1 6 John Singleton Copley 

Mrs. Arthur Browne 

Wife of Rev. Arthur Browne. A companion picture, repre- 
senting a lady dressed in a blue silk robe, and wearing over her 
shoulders a mantle of a reddish tinge. This picture was in the 
possession of Mrs. Charles Burroughs, Portsmouth, N. H. 

The Honorable Mrs. Arthur Browne 

Born in Boston in 1741; married Hon. Arthur Browne, 
second son of the Earl of Altamont, a captain in the British 
Army. She was Anne, daughter of Dr. Sylvester Gardiner, 
and was a celebrated beauty of her time. She is represented 
as wearing a white satin dress ornamented with pearls, holding 
in her left hand a pink satin mantle; the right hand gracefully 
extended; a landscape is on the right; her hair is not powdered, 
and a curl hangs over the left shoulder. This picture was 
painted in England. It belongs to Mr. Robt. H. Gardiner of 
Gardiner, Maine. 

Another of the same subject was in the possession of her 
grandson, the Marquis of Sligo. 

Thomas Boylston 

This picture is of three-fourths length. The dress is a morn- 
ing robe with a white satin waistcoat. He holds a pen in his 
right hand, and the left rests upon the back of a chair. It is 
at Harvard College. 

Mrs. Boylston 

Is painted of three-fourths length, sitting in a chair, with her 
hands crossed upon her lap. Her dress is of gray satin, and 
upon her head is a white cap. In the background there hangs 
a curtain. This picture is in the possession of Harvard College. 



John Singleton Copley 17 

Mrs. John Bacon 

The wife of the Rev. John Bacon, of the Old South Church. 
This lady was the daughter of Mr. Ezekiel Goldthwaite, of 
Boston, was born in 1733, and married for her first husband 
the Rev. Alexander Cummings. The picture was painted in 
1769, and is two and a half feet square. The dress is of brown 
satin, the sleeves rufBed at the elbows, and a lace shawl; over 
the neck, a pearl necklace. A small lace cap completes the 
whole costume. This picture is remarkable for the brilliancy 
given to the eye and the beauty of the hand and arm. She died 
in Stockbridge, in 1821. This portrait, together with the 
original bill for it, is in the possession of a descendant, Miss 
Fannie E. Colt, of Pittsfield, Mass. 

Mrs. Bacon 

The mother of Judge Bacon. This picture was painted in 
1 77 1, and when last heard of was in Utica, N. Y. Its present 
owner is unknown. 

Joseph Barrell 

Mr. Barrell's country house was the main building of what is 
now the McLean Asylum in Somerville. The picture is a 
miniature, set in gold, as a bracelet, measuring one inch and a 
quarter by one inch and a third, and is exquisitely painted. 

John Barrett 

A full-length picture, fifty inches long by forty wide. He 
is represented as seated beside a table; his right hand holds a 
pen and his left rests upon his knee. He is dressed in a suit 
of olive colored cloth. Mr. Barrett was a distinguished mer- 
chant of his time. He was born June 12, 1708. He was one 



1 8 John Singleton Copley 

of the warmest friends and most active supporters of the cause 
of liberty, in behalf of which he gave most liberally from his 
own private means. As an instance of this, he chose to re- 
deem with gold, to a large amount, the paper money paid to 
our troops in Boston by the government. He was one of the 
committee of six, appointed by the merchants of Boston, in 
1768, to resist the imposition by Parliament upon the Colonies 
of the onerous duties on sundry articles of commerce. The 
committee of six were, — Thomas Gushing, John Hancock, 
William Phillips, John Barrett, John Irving, Jr., and Edward 
Payne. On their recommendation the merchants of Boston 
pledged themselves not to send for nor import from Great 
Britain, between January 1, 1769, and January 1, 1770, any 
kind of goods except those absolutely necessary; the same being 
named in an agreement. Mr. Barrett was for many years dea- 
con of Dr. Eliot's church, in Boston, and died September 9, 
1786. This picture is owned by Miss S. D. Barrett, of Boston. 

Mrs. John Barrett 

Was Sarah, daughter of John Gerrish, born July 25, 1711, 
married Mr. Barrett June 3, 1731, and died February 9, 1798. 
In her will Mrs. Barrett mentions the portraits of her husband 
and herself, painted by Copley. Her picture is fifty inches long 
by forty wide, representing her as wearing a robe of olive brown 
brocaded damask, with a dark green cloak ornamented with 
scarlet. The dress is cut square in the neck, over which is 
thrown a muslin kerchief; embroidered muslin sleeves, a muslin 
cap and a pearl necklace complete the costume. This picture 
is owned by Miss S. D. Barrett of Boston. 



John Singleton Copley 19 

Mrs. Anna Pierce Barrell 

This is a very handsome crayon portrait of the first wife of 
Joseph Barrell formerly of Charlestown, Mass. It measures 
seventeen inches by twenty-three inches. The lady died at 
twenty-three years of age. This picture was for many years 
owned by Mrs. J. W. Terry, the youngest daughter of Mrs. 
Electra Barrell Wilder, to whom it descended from her grand- 
father, Joseph Barrell. The flesh tints are pure and warm, hair 
dark brown, eyes greenish blue, large and clear regular features. 
The upper part has been damaged and nearly obliterated. The 
hair is dressed high with a bunch of flowers and a string of 
pearls twisted among them. The bodice is a greenish blue 
satin and is caught by a dull gold brooch in the centre. Sleeves 
looped up by a gold cord. Over one shoulder is drooped a 
peach blossom colored shawl. This picture was shown in the 
Burlington Magazine of May, 1907, and was exhibited during 
the Hudson-Fulton exhibition at the Metropolitan Art Museum. 
It is owned by Mrs. Wm. Allen Putnam of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mrs. Anna Pierce Barrell 

Another beautiful pastel portrait of this lady by Copley of 
the same size as the before-mentioned picture is owned by Miss 
Dorothea Keep and was also shown at the Metropolitan Art 
Museum during the Hudson-Fulton celebration. She has her 
hair dressed high and wears a pink rose in her corsage. 

Mrs. Hannah Fitch Barrell 

This is one of Copley's most beautiful portraits. It is in 
pastel and perfectly preserved. She was the daughter of 
Timothy Fitch, whose portrait, also by Copley, is in the Essex 



so John Singleton Copley 

Institute at Salem. She was the mother of Mrs. Benjamin Joy. 
The picture measures nineteen inches by twenty-four inches. 
Mrs. Barrell was the second wife of Joseph Barrell of Charles- 
town, and in the picture is shown dressed in a bodice of blue 
satin and an overdress of pink silk trimmed with ermine. In 
her bosom she wears a rose bud. Her hair is combed back 
from her face and dressed with a cluster of short curls. Her 
eyes are hazel and lips pouting. It belongs to Mrs. C. H. Joy 
of Boston. 

Captain Stephen Brown 

The size of this picture is about forty-nine inches long by 
thirty-five inches wide. It represents a very handsome man of 
large stature, rich brown complexion, and large black eyes. 
He has black hair brushed off from the forehead and temples, 
raised a little in the middle, and arranged in small bunches at the 
ears in the style of a wig. He is attired in a single breasted, 
dark brown coat, with a very narrow collar, and a narrow black 
cravat encircles his throat; a little of the shirt just appears 
where the waistcoat is open at the top. He wears a very long 
dark green velvet waistcoat, trimmed with narrow gilt braid. 
The sleeves of the coat reach about three-fourths of the length 
of the arms, with buttons on the tops of the cuffs; a small por- 
tion of the shirt sleeves are seen below, fastened with gold 
sleeve buttons. The right hand is holding the coat away, and 
rests on the hip. The left hand hangs by his side in an easy 
position. In the right of the picture is a tree. The background 
is of dark olive green, and, in the left, an island with a few trees 
upon it, and beyond, the sea and a ship. Stephen Brown and 
Mary Barron were married at Charlestown by the Rev. Hull 
Abbott, November 26, 1746. He was a native of Ipswich Ham- 



John Singleton Copley 21 

let, now Hamilton, and the son of one of the earliest settlers 
there, but resided in Charlestown before and after his marriage. 
He died in Edenton, N. C, at the age of thirty-two. It belongs 
to R. M. Pratt of Boston. 

Mrs. Mary Barron Brown 

Was born in Charlestown, August 20, 1726, Married Capt. 
Stephen Brown in 1746, and died December 22, 1801. The 
picture measures thirty-five inches by forty-one. Mrs. Brown 
is represented as a very handsome woman of dark complexion 
with black hair and black eyes. She holds a flower in her right 
hand. She is sitting with her hands lying in her lap, a lawn 
handkerchief crosses her neck the ends passing under a band 
of velvet. Sleeves of velvet and white lawn with ruffles. Her 
dress is of dark blue velvet beautifully painted. The back- 
ground shows glimpses of sky and water and a large tree. This 
fine example of Copley's work is now owned by Mr. R. M. 
Pratt of Boston. 

Nicholas Boylston 
(Three pictures) 

The first is a full length, and is dressed in a blue morning 
robe and purple cap. 

The second dated 1767, with a monogram, is of three-fourths 
length, in a green morning robe, with ships in the distance. He 
was born in 1716, or 1717, and died in 1771. He was one of 
the benefactors of Harvard College, and founded a Professor- 
ship of Rhetoric and Oratory, of which John Quincy Adams 
was the first Professor. These pictures are in the possession of 
Harvard College. 

A third picture of this gentleman represents him as seated 



22 John Singleton Copley 

and dressed in a morning robe and cap. It is of three-fourths 
length, and is in the possession of David P. Kimball of Boston. 

Mrs. Judge Bowler 

Wife of Judge Metcalf Bowler, of Providence, R. I. The 
size of this picture is fifty inches long by forty inches wide. Mrs. 
Bowler is represented as dressed in a blue satin robe, the sleeves 
of which are trimmed with lace. On her head she wears a 
Marie Stuart cap, and she has a sapphire necklace about the 
throat. In her hands she holds a garland of flowers. The 
picture was in the possession of her granddaughter, Mrs. Robert 
Bowler, of Covington, Ky. 

James Bowdoin 

Governor of Massachusetts, was the son of James Bowdoin, 
a member of the Council, who died in 1747, and a grandson of 
Pierre Bowdoin, who emigrated 1685 from La Rochelle. Gov- 
ernor Bowdoin was born in 1726. Harvard College in 1745; 
died 1790. His ability and wealth made him one of the dis- 
tinguished men of his times. A Representative three years, 
Member of the Council sixteen years, and Governor two years, 
displaying great executive ability, especially during Shay's re- 
bellion. He married Elizabeth, daughter of John Erving. He 
had one son, James, who married his cousin, Sarah Bowdoin, 
and one daughter, Elizabeth, who married Sir John Temple, 
Bart. The eldest daughter of Lady Temple married Hon. 
Thomas Lindall Winthrop. The picture at present belongs to 
Mrs. Robt. C. Winthrop. This portrait is an oval miniature. 
Face in profile with white wig and dark coat. Probably painted 
about 1770. 

A small picture of Governor Bowdoin, about seven by ten 



John Singleton Copley 23 

inches representing him as standing in his library, is also owned 
by Mrs. R. C. Winthrop of Boston. 

John Bours 

Portrait of a gentleman dressed in a handsome costume of 
brown velvet with lace at neck and sleeves. He is seated in a 
three legged mahogany chair with right hand holding a book 
and head resting on the other hand. A landscape background. 
It is in its original carved frame. Mr. Bours was a resident of 
Newport, R. I., much interested in affairs of the Episcopal 
Church and a lay preacher in Trinity Church. It is now in the 
Worcester Art Museum. 

Adam Babcock 

The son of Dr. Joshua Babcock of Westerly, R. I. This 
portrait is of a young man nearly full length without wig, seated, 
with hand partly resting on a table and holding a pencil. In 
the other hand he holds a writing tablet. The whereabouts of 
this portrait is unknown to the author. Adam Babcock was 
a distinguished merchant of Boston. 

Mrs. Adam Babcock 

This is a fine example of Copley's work. The figure is seated, 
face slightly turned. She wears a head dress or turban of lace 
and pearls and her dress is of light silk; a dark cloak lined with 
ermine completes her costume. The whereabouts of this pic- 
ture is unknown. 



24 John Singleton Copley 

Rev. Edward Barnard 

An early portrait of this gentleman in his clerical robes is in 
the possession of the Essex Institute at Salem. He was minister 
of the Church at Haverhill, Mass., and died in 1774. 

Battle of the Pyrenees 

This is a very large and grand work, unfinished, sold at the 
Lyndhurst sale in 1864 for five and a half guineas. In it are 
portraits of Duke of Wellington, Prince of Orange and Lord 
Marsh. It is now in the house of Mrs. Gordon Dexter of 
Boston. 

William Clarke 

Son of Dr. John Clarke. The picture is of three-fourths 
length. He is dressed in a rich pearl-colored suit, handsomely 
laced, with a white wig. The left hand on the hip. A cottage 
and trees are in the distance. Mr. William Clarke was a man 
of fortune, having no profession. It was in the possession of his 
great-nephew, Peter Wainwright, Boston. Burned in the fire 
at Boston in 1872. 

Dr. John Clarke 

This picture is of three-fourths length. He is dressed in 
black velvet, with a white wig and stockings, and sitting by a 
table on which stands the manikin. He was a distinguished 
physician of large fortune and great benevolence, practicing 
principally for his own satisfaction, and thence was known in 
Boston as "The poor man's physician." It was in the posses- 
sion of his great-grandson Peter Wainwright, Boston, but was 
burned in the great fire of 1872. 



John Singleton Copley 25 

Elizabeth Braeme Clarke 

Wife of Dr. John Clarke. A companion picture to his. In 
a dress of green silk, with pearl ornaments on the neck and hair. 
The right hand rests on a table, while the left holds a book. 
Her hair is dressed without powder. It was in the possession 
of her great-grandson, Peter Wainwright. Burned in the fire 
at Boston in 1872. 

Richard Clarke 

Was a distinguihsed merchant of Boston. He graduated at 
Harvard College, 1729. A determined loyalist, he was an ad- 
dressor of Hutchinson and Gage, and was proscribed and 
banished. To him was consigned the tea which was destroyed 
in Boston by the celebrated tea party. His sons were Richard 
and Isaac; and his daughters were, Susan, who married John 
Singleton Copley, and Mary, who married Judge Samuel Bar- 
rett. His portrait, which is admirably painted, is in the Family 
Picture, and represents him as a man of commanding presence. 

Mrs. Miriam (Kilby) Clark 

This picture is of life size. She is sitting in a large chair. 
Her hair is black, and the eyes and complexion dark. She 
seems to be between fifty and sixty years of age. Her dress is 
of brown satin, with sleeves to the elbow, and ornamented with 
ruffles. On her head is a simple muslin Quaker cap. A muslin 
half handkerchief on the neck. The dress is open in front. 
She was born about 1700, and married Mr. Benjamin Clark. 
The picture is in Copley's early manner, and was in possession 
of her great-granddaughter, Mrs. Thomas W. Phillips. 



26 John Singleton Copley 

Peter Chardon 

A colored crayon of half length. He is dressed in the gown, 
bands, and wig of an English lawyer. Peter Chardon was born 
in Boston. He came from one of the Huguenot families, driven 
from France by the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. This 
picture was owned by Edward Brooks, Boston. 

Mrs. Joseph Calif 

Was a daughter of Dominicus Jordan, of Scarboro. She 
was born in 1701, and died in 1772. The picture is of life size, 
and nearly full length, and represents her as dressed in a dead- 
leaf-colored satin, the bodice, waist, and sleeves of which are 
trimmed with deep falls of rich lace. On her head is a lace 
cap, and in one hand she holds a book. It is signed and dated 
1765, and was in the possession of Charles E. Miller, Milton. 

Miss Catten 

The size of this picture is three-fourths length. The lady is 
dressed in a rich blue silk, cut square at the throat. She is 
sitting, with her hand resting on a table. This picture was in 
the possession of Mr. Hayden, Boston. 

Samuel Cary 

An oval miniature on ivory. It belongs to Miss E. F. Cary, 
of Cambridge. 

Mrs. Samuel Cary 

She was Sarah Gray. It is a companion picture of that of 
her husband; both are very beautifully painted. It belongs to 
Miss E. F. Cary, of Cambridge. 



John Singleton Copley 27 

Rev. Thomas Cary 

This picture is of life size. The dress is a flowered robe. 
The style of the hair is plain, and is cut short. The scene is a 
library, and the figure is seated, with the hands crossed on an 
open Bible. Mr. Cary was a clergyman, and was born at 
Charlestown, October 7, 1745. Was ordained at Newbury- 
port, May 11, 1768. He died at Newburyport, November 24, 
1808. He was the son of Samuel Cary and Margaret Graves. 
It belongs to Miss E. F. Cary, of Cambridge. 

Lord Cornwallis 

This portrait, measuring twenty-five by thirty, represents 
Cornwallis dressed in the uniform of a British officer, and is 
owned by Peter C. Brooks, Esq., of Boston. 

Myles Cooper, D.D. 

There is believed to be in existence a portrait of this gentle- 
man, who was the second President of Columbia College. A 
copy of the picture is in the New York Historical Society. 

Mrs. Coffin 

She was the wife of Admiral Sir Isaac Coffin. The picture 
is half length. The dress is cut square, with a lace berthe, 
ornamented in front with three bows. The color of the dress 
is steel gray. The hair and eyes are dark, and on the head is 
a frilled cap. Around her neck are three rows of pearls. It is 
a fine example of Copley's American pictures. It is now in the 
possession of Mr. W. D. Sohier. 



28 John Singleton Copley 

Richard Codman 

This picture is of life size, and the figure is seated. It is of 
three-fourths length. The great point of merit in the picture 
is the drawing of the hands, which are holding a letter very 
naturally and gracefully. The subject of this portrait was born 
in Charlestown, Mass., in 1762. He graduated at Harvard 
College in 1782, and died unmarried in 1807. The picture was 
painted about 1790, while he was in England. Mr. Codman 
passed a great part of his life in France, where he made the 
beautiful collection of foreign pictures, now in possession of 
his family. The portrait is now owned by his great-nephew, 
Richard Codman, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Rev. John Codman 

There is a portrait of this gentleman, who was pastor of the 
White Church, owned by Bishop Robert Codman, of Port- 
land, Me. 

John Codman 

Who was married to Abigail Soley. This picture is grave in 
color. The subject is in a sitting posture. The dress is a 
plain buttoned coat. He wears white stockings and a white 
wig. The background is a curtain, a column, and some sky, 
— the blue of which is echoed by the color of the stuff that 
covers the chair, the only yellow in the picture being the brass 
nails in the chair. The left hand is remarkably well drawn, 
even for Copley. The right hand is thrust into the breast of 
the coat. It belongs to Miss M. C. Codman, Washington, 
D. C. 



John Singleton Copley 29 

Thomas Aston Coffin 

Represented as a child of five years of age. He was born in 
Boston in 1754. Graduated at Harvard College in 1772, and 
died in London in 1810. He was the Assistant Commissary to 
the British army, with Brook Watson, under Sir Guy Carleton, 
and continued with Sir Guy after he became Lord Dorchester. 
He was finally promoted to be Commissary-general of the 
British army. He left one daughter, the wife of Dr. Edward 
Hutchinson Robbins, of Boston. He is dressed in a low-necked 
saque of green satin, over a dress of white satin, richly embroid- 
ered with lace, and with ruffles at the wrists. In his plump and 
pretty right hand he holds two cherries, while on his left are 
two white turtle doves. The plumes of his hat are seen behind 
the left hand. On the floor are battledores and shuttlecocks, 
and in the background is a pond and trees. It belongs to Miss 
Wharton, of Boston. 

Charles Stuart, King of England 

This large picture of the King, demanding the surrender of 
the five members, hangs in the Trustees' room of the Boston 
Public Library. It was purchased by a number of Boston ad- 
mirers of Copley for fifteen hundred pounds. Two sketches 
for this picture were sold at the Lyndhurst sale. 

Mrs. Copley 

There is a small oval pastel portrait of Mrs. Susannah Cop- 
ley, the wife of the artist, in the possession of Mrs. Gordon 
Dexter. 

Lord Camperdown 
This portrait was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1798. 



30 John Singleton Copley 

Cupid Caressing Venus 

This picture was sold at the Lyndhurst sale in London for 
£io y ios., and is now owned by Mrs. Gordon Dexter. The 
two portraits are those of Mrs. Copley and the infant Lord 
Lyndhurst. Mrs. Copley as Venus has pale golden dair, bound 
with blue. 

Children of George III 

Represents one of the princesses holding over her head a 
tambourine, another sitting in a carriage, and a third behind 
the carriage. Parrots in the grape vine overhead. The picture 
was engraved by Bartalozzi and published by Copley in 1792. 
The portraits are of Princesses Mary, Sophia, and Amelia. It 
belongs to the King of England. There was a highly finished 
sketch for this picture sold at the Lyndhurst sale in 1864. 

Prince Charles and Son 

This is a handsome oval portrait of a man apparently forty- 
five and a boy about twelve years of age. The elder has his 
hand resting on the back of a chair. He is dressed in dark 
green. The boy holds a drawing of a head grasped by both 
hands. He is dressed in rich blue velvet. Both wear white 
wigs. Governor Swan purchased this portrait while in Lon- 
don representing the United States government, and it was 
bought from his collection by the late Parker C. Chandler of 
Boston, and it is now owned by Edward S. Chapin of Boston. 



John Singleton Copley 31 



Candace Crawford 



In regard to this picture, Mr. Allen says: "All the knowl- 
edge I have of the ancient portrait of Candace Crawford was 
obtained from her sister, Mrs. Thorpe, and her daughter, Mrs. 
Henry Smith. They told me more than sixty-five years ago 
that it was one of the earliest paintings of Mr. Copley, the 
celebrated artist. The date of the portrait was not stated to 
me. Miss Crawford was born in 1746; and the likeness repre- 
sents a maiden of about twenty years, wearing a tasteful flounced 
blue silk dress, and a purple rose in her bosom. On the sup- 
position that the age of the lady was twenty, this would allow 
the date of the picture to be about 1766. The work is done in 
good taste, both in the style of drapery and drawing." The 
picture was in the possession of Zachariah Allen, of Providence, 
R. I. 

Rebecca Dumaresq 

This picture is an oval crayon, twelve inches long by eight 
wide. The lady was the daughter of Dr. Sylvester Gardiner. 
She was born in 1745, and was married in 1773 to Philip Dumar- 
esq, a grandson of Hellier Dumaresq, Seigneur des Augres of 
the Island of Jersey. Philip Dumaresq was a captain in the 
British army, and served at Louisburg and elsewhere under 
Sir William Peppereil. He was also at one time an aide-de-camp 
to Lord Dunmore. A determined loyalist, he was proscribed 
and banished in 1778, and died at Nassau, New Providence, in 
181 2-13. This picture was in the possession of her grand- 
daughter, Mrs. John Rice Blake, Boston. Mr. James Dumar- 
esq, her son, also had a half-length portrait in oils, which was 
sent to his brother, Francis Dumaresq, of Jamaica, West Indies, 
where it is believed still to be. 



32 John Singleton Copley 



Richard Dana 



The father of Chief Justice Francis Dana. The size of this 
picture is four feet two inches in length by three feet two inches 
wide. Mr. Dana is dressed in the wig, bands, and black robe 
of a barrister of the eighteenth century. He was born in Cam- 
bridge, Mass., August 7, 1699; graduated at Harvard College 
in 1 7 18; married a sister of Edward Trowbridge, and died in 
Boston, May 17, 1772. He took a prominent part in the move- 
ments which preceded the Revolution. This fine picture is in 
the possession of Richard Dana, of Cambridge. Copley painted 
a duplicate, which is in the possession of the descendants of 
Mr. Dana in England, and is said to be the better of the two. 

Rev. Edmund Dana 

Was born at Cambridge in 1739, graduated at Harvard 
College in 1759. He was Vicar of Wroxeter, Salop, and mar- 
ried the Hon. Helen, daughter of Charles, sixth Lord Kinnaird. 
This picture is of full length, and is beautifully colored. The 
subject is dressed in a crimson velvet morning gown, with 
white small clothes, stockings, and wearing a dark velvet cap. 
This picture was unfortunately destroyed about 1840. 

Mrs. Derby 

First wife of Richard Derby. This is' a very large picture, in 
Copley's latest manner, of a lady dressed in white, ornamented 
with gold. She is represented as St. Cecilia, playing on a harp, 
and angels are flying in the air above her. It is signed and 
dated 1806, and is in the possession of Miss Marjorie C. Apple- 
ton, of Boston, and is loaned to the Boston Art Museum. 



John Singleton Copley 33 

Gilbert De Blois 

Was a distinguished merchant of Boston, a determined 
loyalist, holding offices under the British Government. He 
built the fine old mansion known as the De Blois house, which 
stood where the Horticultural Hall now is. An addressor of 
Governor Hutchinson in 1774 and of Governor Gage in 1775, 
in 1778 he was proscribed and banished. In 1794 he presented 
an address to King George III., in London, where he remained 
for many years, and where the picture was painted. Mr. De 
Blois is represented sitting partly in profile, dressed in a brown 
coat with a white wig. His right hand rests upon a table in 
front of him, holding a pen, and over his head is a crimson 
curtain, with sky in the background. It is a fine specimen of 
Copley's latest manner. It now belongs to Mrs. C. H. Parker, 
of Boston. 

Mrs. Lanfrey Delisle 

Was Bathsheba, daughter of Judge Met calf Bowler. She 
married a French gentleman who came to this country with 
Lafayette. By a letter from her, dated 1785, we learn that she 
arrived at the country seat of her father-in-law T , near Grenoble, 
in safety, and was most kindly received by her husband's fam- 
ily. The marriage seems to have been a very happy one. Her 
portrait is a miniature on ivory, one and one-quarter inches 
long, by one inch wide. It was taken before her marriage, and 
represents the head and shoulders of a young lady, with her 
hair rolled back, dressed with flowers. Her dress is of pink, 
with a " bouquet de corsage." The portrait was in the pos- 
session of her grand niece, Mrs. M. Knight, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



34 John Singleton Copley 

Colonel Duchenhausen 

A fine portrait study head for the large painting of the siege 
of Gibraltar. It is owned by Mrs. Gordon Dexter of Boston. 

Major-General De La Motte 

A fine study head made for the " Siege of Gibraltar," of life 
size, is owned by Mrs. Gordon Dexter. 

Death of Chatham 

This celebrated picture is in the National Portrait Gallery. 
It contains forty-five different portraits, and has been engraved 
by Bartolozzi. The first sketch of this picture was sold at the 
Lyndhurst sale, and is now owned by Mrs. Gordon Dexter, 
and a second finished sketch was at one time shown in the 
Boston Art Museum. There was also another sketch owned 
by Lyman H. Tasker of Greenwood, Mass. 

Death of Major Pierson 

This large picture hangs in the National Portrait Gallery. 
Mrs. Copley's features appear in the female group. It has 
been engraved by Heath. The first sketch for this picture was 
sold at the Lyndhurst sale in 1864. The original picture was 
painted for Alderman Boydell, but was repurchased by Copley. 
It was bought at the Lyndhurst sale for £1,600. 

Mrs. Deas and Children 

This group picture consists of four female figures and a 
dog, and represents Mrs. John Hartley, Mrs. Deas and chil- 
dren, one of whom became Mrs. John Ward and the other 
Mrs. Wm. Somersall. The smallest child in pink dress, elderly 



John Singleton Copley 35 

woman in black with white neck scarf and bonnet, oldest girl 
in gray silk with blue sash. Mother in background and child 
about six years old in foreground. This picture was exhibited 
at the Metropolitan Art Museum during the Hudson-Fulton 
celebration in 1909. Size, fifty by seventy-six, and owned by 
D. Maitland Armstrong, of New York. 

Family Portrait 
The picture shows the artist and his family, life size. The 
old man before him is Mr. Clarke, his father-in-law, famous as 
the consignee of the cargo of tea of the "Boston Tea Party." 
Mrs. Copley, on the sofa, is carressing their son John, after- 
wards Lord Lyndhurst. This is one of Copley's best paintings. 
It shows the early English manner and yet retains the best 
qualities of his American work. It is in the Boston Art Mu- 
seum. Completed in England in 1802. 

Mrs. Fort 

This is a full-length seated figure of an elderly lady in white 
cap. Work bag hanging on the chair arm, and she appears to 
be engaged in tatting. The picture was exhibited at the Hud- 
son-Fulton Exhibition in the Metropolitan Art Museum. It is 
now in the possession of the Wadsworth Athanseum of Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Colonel Fitch 

The portrait of Colonel Fitch of the British Army and his 
two sisters, Miss Ann Fitch and Mrs. Leonard Vassal, painted 
by Copley for Mr. Lloyd, in London, in 1800, is a large and 
important work now belonging to Mrs. Gordon Abbott of Bos- 
ton. The figures are life size. Colonel Fitch, dressed in his 
uniform, is standing with his horse, Miss Fitch is dressed in 
black, and Mrs. Vassal is in white. 



36 John Singleton Copley 

Lord Fauconberg 

This handsome portrait is owned by Mrs. Gordon Dexter of 
Boston. It is half length life size, representing him dressed in 
a red coat with gold epaulets, holding the pommel of his sword. 
A coat of arms is in the upper part of the picture. He lived 
opposite Mr. Copley's house in London. Died in 1802. This 
picture was engraved by Heath. 

Timothy Fitch 

Was a distinguished merchant of Boston. The size of this 
picture is five feet long by four feet wide, and was painted 
between 1760 and 1767. It is in a fine state of preservation, 
and is of life size. It represents a gentleman seated by a table, 
on which is a cocked hat and a letter bearing an address. The 
costume is a gold laced coat and waistcoat, with a white wig 
and silk stockings. This picture is in the Esesx Institute, 
Salem. 

Mrs. Timothy Fitch 

Was born in 1731. She was the daughter of Colonel John 
Brower. The Browers are an old English family, distinguished 
and wealthy in the days of Salem's Colonial prosperity. She 
married for her first husband, Mr. Plaisted; and married Mr. 
Fitch in 1760, and died in 1799. She is represented as sitting, 
holding her work near a small table. Her dress is of a purplish 
pink satin, with blue lining. The sleeves are loose and caught 
up at the elbow. Her hair is without powder. Behind her is 
a heavy green drapery. This picture is in the Essex Institute, 
Salem. 



John Singleton Copley 37 



Thomas Fluker 



He was the last Secretary of the Province of Massachusetts, 
before the Revolution. The size of the portrait is twenty-nine 
inches long by twenty-four wide. Both face and figure are 
turned one-quarter round from the viewer to the left. The coat 
and waistcoat are in the fashion of the day, without collars, 
and buttoning single breasted to the throat. They are of a 
bluish gray tint. He wears a gray wig, and the ordinary cravat 
of the time. Secretary Fluker was the great-grandfather of 
Admiral Henry Knox Thatcher, United States Navy, and the 
picture came into the possession of Bowdoin College, under 
the will of Mrs. Lucy F. Thatcher, of Rockland, Me. 

Mrs. Dorothy Forbes 

Was a daughter of James Murray, born in London, in 1745. 
She came to America with her parents in 1749, and married 
the Rev. John Forbes in 1769. Her portrait hangs to-day in 
the home of her youth, where she lived one hundred and forty 
years ago. She was the grandmother of Robert Bennett Forbes 
and John Murray Forbes, and died at Milton in 181 1. The 
picture is thirty-seven inches high by twenty-seven wide, and 
represents her as dressed in yellow satin, ornamented with 
silver lace. The sleeves, which are short, are edged with beau- 
tiful lace. She wears a large hoop, and her hair, which is 
brushed over a cushion, is decorated with a white bow. Her 
earrings are of pearl, and a necklace of the same encircles her 
throat. It is in the possession of Mrs. Sarah Forbes Hughes, 
of Milton. 



38 John Singleton Copley 

Fowle 

There was a portrait of Colonel Fowle, of Marblehead, in 
the possession of the heirs of William Fowle, of Alexandria, Va. 

Timothy Folger 

This picture measures forty inches by fifty inches in its 
original carved frame. It represents a middle-aged man, 
three-quarters length, dressed in dark brown, with white wig. 
The picture now belongs to Mr. Munn of New York. 

The Fortune Teller 

There is a large picture given the above title hanging in the 
Worcester Art Museum, attributed to Copley. It represents a 
young woman at three-quarters length holding a coin in her 
open left hand. The picture is well painted and undoubtedly 
of English origin. 

Benjamin Gerrish 

This picture is of life size and of three-fourths length, being 
thirty inches long by twenty-five wide. Mr. Gerrish is dressed 
in a brown coat, laced cravat and ruffles, and wears a powdered 
wig. He was the son of John Gerrish and the brother of Mrs. 
Sarah Barrett, who bequeathed this picture in her will to her 
youngest son, John Barrett. Mr. Gerrish died in 1777. It was 
in the possession of a grand nephew, Nathaniel Augustus Bar- 
rett, of Boston, and is owned by Miss S. D. Barrett of Boston. 



John Singleton Copley 39 

Mrs. Relief (Dowse) Gill 

This picture is forty-nine inches high by forty wide. It rep- 
resents a very old lady, having a pleasant, benevolent face, 
with large blue eyes. She has a little dark hair showing beneath 
a white lawn cap. Her dress is of brown velvet, opening to 
the waist in front, and filled in with a white lawn handkerchief. 
Over her shoulders is thrown a black thread lace shawl. The 
sleeves reach to the elbows. Below them appear white lawn 
sleeves with ruffles, leaving the wrist and hand uncovered. In 
her right hand she has a book held open slightly, with her 
thumb between the leaves. Her left hand, which shows the 
effect of years, is laid partly over the other. She is sitting in a 
stuffed armchair, covered with a greenish blue material. The 
back of the chair is as high as the top of her head. She was 
probably eighty-three years of age at the time the picture was 
taken, — 1759. It is worthy of note that the name of Relief, 
bestowed upon the mother of Mrs. Dowse, — whose maiden 
name was Relief Holland, — has been continued down in the 
female line for six generations. Relief Dowse married Michael 
Gill, and settled in Charlestown, Mass. Captain Gill made 
many prosperous voyages to various parts of Europe, and left 
a large estate to his posterity. At his death he was a colonel of 
a colonial regiment. On his monumental stone it is recorded 
that he died in 1720, aged forty-seven. His widow survived him 
thirty-nine years. It belongs to Mr. Robert Pratt of Boston. 

Governor Moses Gill 

The size of this picture is forty-nine inches high by forty 
inches wide, with a handsome carved gilt frame. Governor 
Gill was the son of John, the second son of Colonel Gill. His 



4° John Singleton Copley 

mother was Elizabeth Abbott, of Charlestown, — a sister of 
the Rev. Hull Abbott. He was born in 1733, and died in 1800, 
aged sixty-seven. The portrait was painted when he was about 
thirty-three years of age. He married for his first wife, Sarah, 
only child of Rev. Thomas Prince, of Boston. His second wife 
was a daughter of Thomas Boylston. He is represented as a 
fine-looking man, with black eyes and a well-shaped forehead. 
He wears a powdered wig, and the hair cr&ped at the ears. His 
dress is a dark blue single-breasted velvet coat, lined with 
white satin, unbuttoned, and held back to the hip by the right 
hand. The sleeves are very large, with deep cuffs fastened up 
with two buttons, — the shirt-sleeves coming below, terminating 
with a very narrow band of linen cambric. He wears a very 
long, white satin waistcoat, and a muslin cravat is around the 
throat. The hands are beautifully painted, especially the left 
one. Between the fingers is held a paper, addressed to Mr. 
Moses Gill, Boston. For the background of the picture: on 
the right is a long, white window shutter, with bluish green 
drapery; on the left is part of a desk, with a green velvet cover. 
This picture is now in the Rhode Island School of Design. 

Mrs. Sarah (Prince) Gill 

The first wife of Governor Moses Gill; was the only child 
of Rev. Thomas Prince; born July 16, 1728; married April, 
1759, and died August 5, 1771. The size of the picture is 
forty-nine inches high by forty wide, in a handsome carved 
frame of antique style. She is represented as having a very 
refined and intellectual countenance, with black hair carried 
off from her forehead and temples, with strings of pearls en- 
twined. Of dark complexion, she has black eyes and eye- 
brows, with delicate features. She is sitting, with her right 



John Singleton Copley 41 

arm resting on what appears to be a portion of a tree, with dark 
olive background, excepting towards the left, where there is an 
opening of sky, with blue hills in the distance, and an oak tree 
in the middle distance. She is dressed in a dark blue velvet 
robe, with muslin undersleeves reaching below the elbows, and 
with double ruffles. Four rows of pearl beads encircle the 
throat, — one row coming down over the left shoulder to the 
middle of the bust, where two long loops fall over the bows of 
white lace scarf, edged with gold, and embellished with gold 
sprigs. The scarf has a broad end in front, and is very pret- 
tily draped over the arm and sleeves to the back of the dress. 
The right hand falls gracefully from the support on which it 
is resting, and in her left hand she carries a book, held slightly 
open with her thumb. This picture is now in the Rhode Island 
School of Design. 
A crayon portrait of this lady is also in existence. 

Mrs. Rebecca (Boylston) Gill 

The second wife of Governor Gill; daughter of Thomas Boyl- 
ston. The size of this picture is forty-nine inches long by 
forty wide, with a fine frame of antique style. She is repre- 
sented with a handsome face, dark blue eyes, and black eye- 
brows. Her hair is black, carried entirely off her forehead and 
temples, and arranged high with a scarf of reddish brown, dotted 
with gold, and fastened at the top with a few pearls. The scarf 
is carried over the right shoulder, and falls over the arm m 
front. She is standing by a garden vase, containing a lily, with 
many dark leaves and flowers in blossom. Her left hand rests 
on the edge of the vase; and in the right hand, — which is most 
beautifully painted, — she holds a lily. Her dress is of blue 
velvet, or satin, with an embroidery of gold in a red velvet 



42 John Singleton Copley 

band around the bosom. There is a girdle of the same kind, 
about three inches wide, around the waist. The tucker of point 
lace is most exquisitely painted. A crimson drapery hangs 
gracefully over the back of the dress, and falls over the arm in 
front. On the left is a pillar. Behind her figure there is a 
dark background of brown and green. At a distance, on the 
right, is a glimpse of sky, with a portion of the trunk of a tree, 
and with the green leaves of a vine entwined around it. It is 
in the possession of the Rhode Island School of Design. 

There is another portrait of this lady, painted in oil, and 
signed in monogram, and dated 1757. This picture and the 
crayon of the Governor's first wife were in the possession of 
Mr. Boylston, of Princeton, Mass. 

?■ Gore 

There is at the house of the Misses Robins of Boston a 
painting of the portraits of the Gore children, brothers and 
sisters of Governor Gore. If by Copley, it is a very early one. 
It contains portraits of Frances Gore, who married Col. Thomas 
Crafts; Miss Gore, who married Mr. Taylor; Samuel Gore, 
who married Mary Pierce, and John Gore, who married Sarah 
Foster. The author does not feel sure of the authenticity of 
the picture. 

Another picture contains portraits of Governor Gore when a 
child, and his sister, at the house of Mr. Edward B. Robins. 

A third picture has the portraits of two of the sisters. 

Elizabeth Clarke Greene 

Mrs. Gordon Dexter has in her collection a very handsome 
portrait of this lady. She was the daughter of Copley, sister 
of Lord Lyndhurst and wife of Gardiner Greene. 



John Singleton Copley 43 

George IV 

This large and important picture represents the King when 
Prince of Wales, mounted, witnessing a review, attended by 
Lord Heathfield, General Turner, Colonel Bloomrleld, Baron 
Eben, Colonel Quintin. It was exhibited at the Royal Acad- 
emy in 1 810, and is now owned by Mrs. Gordon Dexter of 
Boston. 

Sir Robert Graham 

The portrait of the above in his robes of office is owned by 
Mrs. Gordon Dexter of Boston. 

John Gray 

A relative of Harrison Gray Otis. He is represented as 
standing, dressed in a brown coat, with a white satin waist- 
coat, lace cravat and ruffles. This picture was loaned by the 
Misses Rogers to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, April, 
1908. 

Harrison Gray 

This picture is of life size and half length. The dress is of 
brown velvet, with steel buttons and with lace at the wrists and 
neck; a gray wig dressed with a queue completes the costume. 
He was the Receiver-general of Massachusetts and addressor 
of Governor Hutchinson, and Councillor. He was proscribed 
and banished during the Revolution. "Mr. Gray," says Sabine, 
"was an exemplary gentleman in every relation, and among 
the loyalists there is hardly one more deserving of respect and 
kind remembrance." It is now in the Museum of the Fine Arts, 
Boston. 



44 John Singleton Copley 



Green 



Probably Jeremiah. This is a large picture, representing 
Mr. Green as sitting, reading a Latin book, as the words on 
the page are distinctly visible. This picture was in the pos- 
session of his granddaughter, Miss Abigail Joy, of Boston. 

Mrs. Green 

The wife of Jeremiah (?) Green. She is dressed in white 
satin, in the fashion of the times. This was in the possession 
of Miss Abigail Joy, of Boston. 

Lieut. Francis Greene 

Was an officer in the British army, holding a commission in 
the Fortieth Regiment of Infantry. He served in the old 
French war, at Louisburg, and in Canada, also in Martinique 
and Havana. He graduated at Harvard College in 1760, and 
wrote much on the subject of the education of the deaf and 
dumb. He died at Medford in 1809. The size of this picture 
is two feet six inches long by two feet wide, of half length; he 
is dressed in the full uniform of a lieutenant in the British 
army. In one corner is Copley's monogram and signature, 
with date, 1763. It was in the possession of Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Francis Matthews Greene, U. S. N. 

Thomas Greene 

Was an eminent merchant of Boston, where he was born 
June 4, 1705. He was the eldest son of Nathaniel and Anne 
Gold Greene, who came to Boston from Warwick, R. I. He 
married for his second wife, September 6, 1744, Martha Coit, 



John Singleton Copley 45 

daughter of John Coit of New London, Conn., and widow of 
Daniel Hubbard, who died 1741. 

Mr. Thomas Greene died in August, 1763. He left five 
sons, Thomas, John, Nathaniel, Joseph, and David, and one 
daughter, Mary, married to Daniel Hubbard. 

This portrait is forty inches by fifty inches, and represents 
Mr. Greene as dressed in a suit of drab color with black waist- 
coat. He wears ruffles and a large powdered wig. He is 
seated in an old-fashioned chair by a table, on which is an 
inkstand, letter, etc. On the right is a green curtain drawn 
back, disclosing through an open window a ship under full 
sail flying the British flag. Mr. Green holds in his hand an 
open letter bearing the date of September 25, 1758, undoubt- 
edly the time at which it was painted. A copy of this picture 
belongs to Mr. C. W. Hubbard of Boston. 

The original belongs to David Greene Haskins of Cambridge. 

Mrs. Thomas Greene 

Born in New London, Conn., in 1706, was Martha, the young- 
est daughter of John and Mehitable Chandler Coit, of New 
London, Conn. She married, first, Daniel Hubbard, sheriff 
of New London, a graduate of Yale College in 1727, a tutor 
in the College, and who died in 1741, and second, in 1744, 
Mr. Thomas Greene. She is represented in a brown robe, 
trimmed with white satin, the sleeves and neck decorated with 
lace. Her hair is drawn back in curls, one of which rests upon 
her shoulder. The pose of the head is very erect. The eye- 
brows are arched, and the eyes are dark and brilliant. The 
background represents a landscape, with rocks and trees. The 
figure, which is not quite full length, is seated with one arm 
resting upon the back of the chair. This picture is in the pos- 
session of David G. Haskins, of Cambridge. 



46 John Singleton Copley 

Thomas Greene and His Wife 

The picture is six inches by eight, and contains the two like- 
nesses, of miniature size, painted in oil, on the same copper 
plate. The frame is of dark wood. The gentleman is in a 
white wig, a green coat, and a ruffled shirt. The lady is dressed 
in a low-necked, claret colored dress of the period, with a pearl 
necklace, and also pearls on her stomacher and in her hair. 
It was in the possession of their great-granddaughter, Miss 
Mary G. Chapman, Boston 

Joseph Greene 

Was a son of Thomas and Martha Coit Greene; he was 
born in 1745. This portrait is twenty-two inches high by 
eighteen inches wide, in the original frame, and is signed and 
dated 1767. It is a crayon, representing a young man dressed 
in a stone colored coat and waistcoat, into which latter his 
right hand is thrust; on his head is a white wig, and about his 
neck and wrists is handsome lace. This picture is in the Bos- 
ton Art Museum. 

Mrs. Joseph Greene 

Wife of Joseph Greene, and daughter of Benjamin and 
Mary Greene; a crayon representing the lady, who was a 
cousin of her husband, as arrayed in a delicate rose-tinted 
dress, edged round the neck with rich lace, and a mantle of 
fawn color, having a blue knot on the left shoulder. Her hair, 
which is without powder, is ornamented with small roses. The 
portrait is signed and dated 1767, is in the original frame, and 
is believed to have been taken about the time of her marriage, 
when she was celebrated for her beauty. It was in the pos- 
session of her daughter, Miss Anne Reading Greene, of Milton. 



John Singleton Copley 47 

Gardiner Greene 

The son of Benjamin and Mary, was born in Boston in 1753. 
He married, first, Ann Redding; second, Elizabeth Hubbard; 
and third, in London, in 1800, Elizabeth Clarke, the daughter 
of John Singleton Copley, the artist, and sister of John, Baron 
Lyndhurst, sometime Lord Chancellor of England. He was 
eighth in direct descent from Robert Greene of Gillingham, in 
in the time of Henry the Eighth, and was a distinguished mer- 
chant of Boston. The portrait is of half length. The figure is 
seated in a chair, dressed in a blue coat with brass buttons. 
The hair is powdered. It is a fine specimen of Copley's latest 
manner. The picture was presented by the Lord Chancellor 
Lyndhurst to his nephew, the Rev. John Singleton Copley 
Greene, of Longwood, Mass., and was burned in the great fire 
of 1872. 

Mrs. Gardiner Greene 

A companion picture to that of her husband, was Elizabeth 
Clarke, daughter of John Singleton Copley. She married, in 
1800, Gardiner Greene of Boston. The picture is of half length. 
It was painted by her father just before her wedding, for a 
keepsake. She is dressed "a la Josephine" in white muslin, 
with a shawl thrown over her arm. This picture is in the pos- 
session of Mrs. Gordon Dexter of Boston. 

Mrs. Gardiner Greene 

As a child. This portrait was probably a study for the 
family picture, but its whereabouts is at present unknown. { 



48 John Singleton Copley 

Gardiner Greene and Mrs. Murray 

His aunt, painted in 1765, when Mr. Greene was but twelve 
years of age. This picture is of three-fourths length, repre- 
senting the lady dressed in a pearl colored satin, trimmed with 
rich lace, her hair without powder. She is seated with her 
right hand resting on the boy's shoulder, while she holds his 
left hand in hers. The boy stands by her side dressed in a 
brown coat lined with blue silk. In his right hand he holds 
his hat. This beautiful picture was in the original frame, and 
in the possession of the heirs of the Rev. John S. C. Greene, 
but was burned in the great fire of 1872. 

Benjamin Greene 

The father of the Gardiner Greene who married the eldest 
daughter of Copley. He is represented as sitting sideways 
upon a chair with his face in profile. The dress is a rich blue 
suit and a full wig. His right hand rests upon the back of a 
chair, while his left is thrust into a flowered waistcoat. He is 
looking towards a table on which are papers and a pen. The 
picture is of three-fourths length and in the original frame. It 
was in the possession of the heirs of his grandson, the Rev. 
John S. C. Greene, of Longwood, and was destroyed in the 
great fire of 1872. 

Councillor Joseph Green 

This beautiful and characteristic picture is a crayon of life 
size and half length, representing him in a morning costume 
of dark gray. He wears a cap of the same color, and his collar 
is thrown open. Joseph Green was born in Boston in 1706; 
graduated at Harvard College in 1726. He was a merchant, 



John Singleton Copley 49 

and had a large fortune. He was celebrated as a scholar, a 
poet, and a man of wonderfully ready wit, which he often 
showed in his contests with a fellow wit, the Rev. Dr. Byles. 
At the time of his death he had probably the most beautiful and 
valuable private library in New England, some volumes of 
which have descended to the heirs of the Rev. William T. 
Snow. Mr. Green was a Mandamus Councillor, and addressor 
of Governor Hutchinson; and was proscribed and banished. 
He died in England in 1780. This picture belonged to the 
Rev. William T. Snow, of Jamaica Plain. 

Joseph Green 

A merchant of Boston; born December 12, 1703, and died 
July 1, 1765. He was the son of the Rev. Joseph Green, of 
Salem Village, now Danvers, who was graduated at Harvard 
College in 1695. It is a crayon of life size and half length. 
The costume is a single-breasted coat and waistcoat of a dark 
color, with large embroidered buttons. The cravat is white, 
and the shirt ruffles are slightly exposed. A full powdered wig 
completes the picture. The coloring is as fresh and perfect as 
if just from the artist's hands. It is in the original frame, and 
was in the possession of his great grandson, Dr. Joshua Green, 
of Groton. 

Mrs. Joseph Green 

A companion picture to that of her husband. In a dress of 
blue velvet, trimmed with ermine. She wears pearls in her 
hair and around her neck. This picture was in the possession 
of the heirs of the Rev. William T. Snow, of Jamaica Plain. 



50 John Singleton Copley 

John Gardiner 

The second son of Dr. Sylvester Gardiner. He defended 
John Wilkes before Lord Mansfield, in 1763, and was Attorney- 
general of the British West India Islands in 1778. He was a 
Representative in the Massachusetts Legislature from 1789 
until his death. "He had," says Updyke, "an astonishing 
memory, was an admirable belle-lettre scholar, very learned 
in his profession, and particularly distinguished for wit and 
eloquence." He was lost at sea in 1793. The figure is of three- 
fourths length. He is dressed in a brown coat, laced waistcoat, 
and is sitting at a table with books and papers. This picture 
is in the possession of Mrs. C. P. Gardiner, of Brookline. 

Rev. Daniel Greenleaf 

We learn from Freeman's "History of Cape Cod," that this 
gentleman was a son of Stephen Greenleaf, of Newbury; that 
he was born in 1679, was graduated at Harvard College in 1699, 
and married Eliza, daughter of Sheriff Gookin, of Suffolk, and 
granddaughter of Major-general Gookin, of Cambridge. Free- 
man also states that a portrait of him by Copley has been pre- 
served, representing him as an old man of venerable aspect. He 
died in 1763. This picture was in the possession of his descend- 
ant, Richard C. Greenleaf, of Boston. 

General Greaton 
A portrait said to be in New York. . ,V 



John Singleton Copley 51 

Henry Hill 

He was the son of Thomas and Hannah Hill; born in 1736; 
graduated from Harvard College in 1756; married Anna Bar- 
rett in 1762; and died in 1828, aged ninety-two. This is a 
crayon of one-half length, twenty-three inches long by seven- 
teen wide, and is in the original frame, a companion picture to 
that of his wife. Mr. Hill is dressed in a coat of a sage green 
color, and wears a powdered wig with a laced cravat. This 
picture was in the possession of Mrs. Todd, of Cambridge. 

Mrs. Henry Hill 
Anna, a daughter of John and Sarah Barrett, born March 8, 
1740, married to Henry Hill in 1762. Their residence was in 
Summer Street. She died December 8, 1822, aged eighty-two. 
Her portrait is a crayon of three-fourths length, measuring 
twenty-three inches high by seventeen wide. The dress is of 
light flowered brocade, with a blue mantle. Her hair is dressed 
with flowers, and around her neck is a pearl necklace. 

John Hancock 

A picture of three-fourths length. He is dressed in a blue 
coat laced with gold. His left hand is resting on a book while 
his right hand holds a pen. He was born in 1737. Harvard 
College in 1754. President of Congress and first signer of the 
Declaration of Independence. Governor of Massachusetts in 
1783 and died in office, 1793. This picture is now in the 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. A copy by Savage is owned by 
Mrs. J. W. Tilton of Haverhill. 

Another picture shows Governor Hancock dressed in a blue 
coat laced with gold. Owned by Mrs. J. W. Tilton of Haverhill. 

Copley also painted a miniature which was exhibited in New 
York several years ago. 



52 John Singleton Copley 

Benjamin Hallo well 

Was a brother of Sarah Hallowell, who married Samuel 
Vaughan of London. He is represented as a man of about 
twenty-five years of age, seated at a table with books and hold- 
ing a pen in his hand. He is dressed in a suit of gray silk with 
buttons, faced with satin; a white cravat and ruffles, with white 
silk stockings, complete the costume. The picture measures 
four feet one inch long by three feet three inches wide. It is 
in the possession of Mrs. W. M. Vaughan, of Cambridge. 

Miss Hall 

This picture is of half length, and life size, representing a 
lady dressed in black velvet in the fashion of the times; the 
throat and sleeves decorated with rich lace. In her hand she 
holds a rose bud. The picture is now owned by Mr. Clarke 
of New York. 

Hugh Hall 

A crayon eighteen inches long by sixteen wide, dated 1758, 
J. S. Copley. It was in the possession of his great-grand- 
daughter, Miss Baury of Boston. 

Thomas Hancock 

He was born in 1703, and died in 1764; was the son of the 
Rev. John Hancock of Lexington, and married Lydia, the 
daughter of Daniel Henchman, of Boston, He founded the 
Hancock Professorship of Hebrew and other Oriental languages, 
and built the Hancock house on Beacon Street in 1737. This 
is a half length portrait in crayons. He is dressed in the style 
of the period. This picture belongs to Mrs. J. W. Tilton of 
Haverhill. 



John Singleton Copley 53 

Mrs. Lydia Hancock 

The wife of Thomas Hancock. A crayon of half length. 
She died in 1777, and devised in her will the old parsonage 
house in Court Street to Brattle Street Church. It is in the 
possession of Mrs. J. W. Tilton of Haverhill. 

Thomas Hancock 

This is a full length picture, very finely painted. He is 
dressed in a black velvet suit, white gloves, and a white wig. 
The right hand rests on a chair. It is in the possession of 
Harvard College. 

Mrs. Lydia Hancock 

This a finely painted picture. She is in mourning, with a 
black dress, a white linen under cap and neckerchief; a black 
crape hood enveloping the head and neck. It is in the pos- 
session of Harvard College. 

Thomas Hancock 

The size of this picture is three inches long by four and a 
half wide. It is an oval miniature in oil on copper. He is 
dressed in a pearl colored velvet suit and white necktie. The 
hair is powdered and gathered into a white queue. The face 
has the look of one past middle age. 

Joshua Henshaw 

He was born in 1703, married Elizabeth Bill in 1733, and was 
distinguished among the early patriots of Boston, holding many 
offices of trust and honor. The picture is of half length, and 



54 John Singleton Copley 

the dress is a brown coat and full white wig. The right hand 
rests upon a curtain which seems to hang upon a pillar, while 
the left hand holds a white glove. It is in the original frame. 
It belonged to Mr. Sidney W. Hayward. 

Joseph Henshaw 

A nephew of Joshua Henshaw, whose daughter he married. 
He was born in 1727; graduated at Harvard College in 1748. 
During the Revolution he was indefatigable with pen, speech, 
and money, in support of the Colonial cause. He was dressed 
in a blue velvet coat, with the left hand in the breast, and a full 
white wig. He has a very handsome, determined countenance. 
It belonged to Mr. Sydney W. Hayward. 

Sarah Henshaw 

The daughter of Joshua Henshaw, and the wife of her cousin, 
Joseph Henshaw. It is a crayon of half size. She is dressed 
in a salmon colored robe, with pearls in her hair. Her left hand 
holds the end of a fur tippet, which passes over and falls from 
her right shoulder. Upon her head is a blue silk hood. It 
belonged to Mr. Sidney W. Hayward. 

John B. Holmes 

This is a half length portrait of a boy of about ten years of 
age, in the costume of the times, consisting of a blue coat, a red 
silk waistcoat, and lace ruffles at the neck and wrists. His right 
hand is thrust into his waistcoat pocket, and on his left arm sits 
a pretty squirrel eating a nut. It belongs to Mrs. William Allen 
Putnam of New York. 



John Singleton Copley 55 

William Holmes 

A younger brother of John B. Holmes. The picture is of the 
same size as that of his brother, differing in the colors of the 
dress. The boy stands with one hand resting on a small grey- 
hound. It belongs to Mr. Macbeth of New York. 

Mrs. Isaac Holmes 

She was Rebecca Bee. She married Mr. Isaac Holmes, of 
Charleston, S. C. Her mother's name was also Holmes. Her 
portrait is of life size, and half length. Her dress is in the 
fashion of the times, of white satin, trimmed at the neck and 
sleeves with rich lace. Her hair is drawn back, and braided 
with pearls, and a pearl necklace encircles her throat three 
times. 

Lord Heathfield 

There is a fine portrait in the National Gallery and a study 
head of the same officer made for the Siege of Gibraltar owned 
by Mrs. Gordon Dexter of Boston. George Augustus Eliott was 
raised to the peerage in 1787 as Baron Heathfield of Gibraltar. 

Thomas Hutchinson 

Was the son of Thomas Hutchinson, of Boston, and Sarah, 
daughter of Colonel John Foster. He was born in Boston, 1 71 1 ; 
was a graduate of Harvard College, 1727. 

He served as a representative seven years, and as Speaker of 
the House three years; was Judge of Probate in 1752, and a 
Councillor from 1749 to 1766. He was Lieutenant-Governor 
from 1758 to 1771, and was appointed Chief Justice of Massa- 
chusetts in 1760, holding, says Mr. Drake, "four high offices at 



56 John Singleton Copley 

the same time." He was appointed Governor of Massachusetts 
in 1 77 1. A very able writer, a powerful orator, and an uncom- 
promising Loyalist, he was exceedingly unpopular; and on ac- 
count of his support of the Stamp Act, his house was sacked 
and his furniture and many valuable historical manuscripts 
were burned in the street. He left the country, and went to 
England in 1774, where he received a pension from the British 
Government, and died at Brompton in 1780. 

This portrait is eighteen inches high by fourteen inches wide, 
and is in the original frame. It represents him as a distinguished 
man, dressed in a light colored coat, and wearing a white wig. 
The picture is in the possession of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society. 

Mrs. Thomas Hutchinson 

The portrait of Margaret Safford, wife of Governor Hutch- 
inson, is owned by Mrs. Gordon Dexter of Boston. 

Colonels Hugo and Schleppengull 

These two fine portrait heads on one canvas are studies for 
the large picture of the Siege of Gibraltar. Sold at the Lynd- 
hurst sale for £10 105, and now belong to Mrs. Gordon Dexter 
of Boston. 

Judge Martin Howard 

There is a very fine example of Copley's art in the portrait 
of Judge Howard of South Carolina. It is three-quarters length 
and he is represented in the red robe of an English judge and 
wears a white wig. The picture hangs in the Social Law 
Library at Boston. 



John Singleton Copley 57 

Mrs. John Hay 

Mrs. Hay whose maiden name was Catherine Farnham is 
represented on an oval canvas as a very beautiful woman with 
dark eyes, hair dressed high with a gold bow on the top. Her 
dress is dark with a simple ruffle around the neck. This por- 
trait was painted in London and is a fine example of the artist's 
work. It was painted in 1780 and is mentioned in a letter 
from Judge Curwen who saw the picture in Copley's studio. 
It now is in the possession of Mr. Francis L. Cobb of Boston. 

Thomas Hubbard 

This picture is of three-fourths length. He was born in 1702 ; 
graduated at Harvard College in 1721, and died in 1773. He 
was Treasurer of the College. The dress is a blue morning 
robe, with a purple cap. Near him is a table, with the keys of 
the College upon it. This picture is in the possession of Har- 
vard College. 

Miss Thankful Hubbard 

The following is a copy of the bill for this miniature but the 
whereabouts of the picture is unknown. 

Boston, May 20, 1758 
Mrs. Fayerweather 

To J. S. Copley, Dr. 

To painting a picture in miniature of Miss Thankful Hubbard, 
one guinea. Received the contents. 

J. S. Copley. 



58 John Singleton Copley 

Edward Holyoke 

President of Harvard College. He was born in 1689 and died 
in 1769; was especially distinguished as a mathematician and 
classical scholar. He is represented in clerical robes, and seated 
in a chair. The picture is in Copley's early manner. It was 
presented to Harvard College in 1830 by Dr. E. A. Holyoke. 

A second portrait represents him, as the other, dressed in a 
black silk robe, with white bands. The size of the picture is 
twenty-six inches long by twenty-one inches wide. It was in the 
possession of his great-grandson, Hon. Hampden Cutts, of 
Brattleborough, Vt. 

Nathaniel Hurd 

Was born in 1730, and was one of the earliest resident en- 
gravers on copper in New England. He engraved several of 
Copley's pictures, and also a representation of the Boston Mas- 
sacre, the seal of Harvard University, and many other beautiful 
specimens of heraldic designs. The head is completed, but the 
rest of the picture is unfinished. It is evident, however, that 
Copley intended to represent his friend, the engraver, charac- 
teristically at work, as the hands, and the shirt sleeves rolled 
up, are more than indicated. It is in the possession of a descend- 
ant, — Nathaniel Furness, of Tarrytown, on the Hudson. 

There is another fine picture of this artist, of half length, 
highly finished, representing him as sitting at a table on which 
are two books, one being a treatise on heraldy. He is dressed 
in a morning robe, with a cap on his head. His arms rest on the 
table, the hands being clasped. It was in the possession of Dr. 
W. Wesselhoeft, of Cambridge. 



John Singleton Copley 59 

Daniel Hubbard 

A life-sized, three-fourths length picture, the canvas being 
four feet and one inch in length by three feet three inches in 
width. He is in full dress, with powdered hair, silk stockings, a 
long white satin waistcoat, with wide cuffs lined with satin. 
There are ruffles at the wrists. This picture is in the possession 
of Mrs. Tudor of Boston. 

Mrs. Daniel Hubbard 

A companion picture to that of her husband. She is taken 
standing by a small table, on which one arm rests, and the other 
is crossed over it. Her black hair is combed back over a cushion, 
and around her neck is a ruff, which, according to the fashion of 
that time, was fastened by a bow to the hair behind. The dress 
is of golden brown satin, low in the neck, and decorated with 
lace. This picture is in the possession of Mrs. Tudor of Boston. 

Robert Hooper 

Of Marblehead, Mass. The portrait is five feet long by 
four wide, including the frame. It represents a robust man 
past middle life, seated at his desk, reading a letter, which is 
held in his left hand. The right hand rests on the desk, on 
which are lying several other letters. The dress is of brown 
cloth, with metal buttons like the court dress of Europe, and is 
completed by a full white wig. He was an eminent merchant, 
born in 17 10, and died in 1790. On account of the magnitude 
of his business and his liberal character, he was known all over 
New England by the sobriquet of King Hooper. The portrait 
was painted in 1767 and now belongs to Miss Hooper of Boston. 



60 John Singleton Copley 

Mrs. Robert Hooper 

Of Marblehead. The size is four feet, two inches high by 
three feet, three inches wide. It is of three-fourths length. 
She is represented in the full costume of the time, very rich and 
elaborate, and is sitting upon a small sofa. She is one of the 
three wives of Robert Hooper, known as King Hooper, whose 
beautiful house at Danvers still remains. This picture is in 
the possession of the Lenox Library, New York. 

Mr. Hooper 

The son of Robert Hooper. Of three-fourths length, in oil. 
Mr. Hooper is represented as standing, in a rich dress of the 
times. It is in the possession of Samuel Hooper of Boston. 

Mrs. Hooper 

Wife of the younger Mr. Hooper, and represented as standing, 
in a rich and appropriate costume. This picture is in the pos- 
session of Samuel Hooper, of Boston. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Inman 

Was a sister of James Murray, and with him emigrated to 
America in 1749. She married first, Capt. Samuel Campbell; 
second, Mr. James Smith, of Milton, in 1760; and third, Mr. 
Ralph Inman, of Cambridge; and died in Boston in 1785. 

This picture was painted in 1769; is forty-nine inches in 
length, by thirty-nine in width. The lady is dressed in a low 
necked, cinnamon-colored satin robe. Over her shoulders is a 
green scarf. The sleeves are decorated with rich lace. Her 
hair is combed back over a cushion, ornamented with a string of 



John Singleton Copley 61 

pearls. In her left hand she holds a branch with peaches upon 
it, and a bunch of grapes. This picture is in the possession of 
Mrs. R. P. Rogers, granddaughter of Paul Revere, Canton, 

Mass. 

Mrs. Inches 

Was the second wife of Henderson Inches. She was a 
daughter of Jonathan Jackson. The picture is of three-fourths 
length. It represents a lady standing in a room draped with 
dark green curtains. To the left is a vase, and the sky beyond. 
Her dress is of rose-colored satin, looped at the arms with jewels. 
Her right hand holds her dress back, while with her left she 
seems drawing on her mantle. Close under her chin is a lace 
tie. Her hair is without powder, with a bow on the top of her 
head. It belongs to Mrs. Joseph Chester Inches of Boston. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Izard 

This picture now hanging in the Boston Museum of Fine 
Arts was painted during Copley's visit to Rome in 1 774-1 775. 
Mr. Izard was a wealthy planter of South Carolina, and Mrs. 
Izard before her marriage was Miss Alice De Lancey of Mam- 
aroneck, N. Y. The figure of Mrs. Izard as she submits a 
sketch to her husband is full of charm but the figure of the gen- 
tleman is rather hard and stiff. The two people are seated 
at a handsomely carved table with drapery showing a landscape 
and statue in the background. 

Mrs. Jephson 

Was a daughter of Thomas Fluker, Secretary of the Province 
of Massachusetts, and a portrait of her by Copley is mentioned 
in a letter from Mrs. Urquhart to her sister, Mrs. General Knox. 
This letter is among the papers of Admiral Thacher. It is 



62 John Singleton Copley 

stated that she died early, and left no children. In a note from 
William Knox, 1783, he says that "Miss Fluker is made the 
happy wife of a member of the Irish Parliament. Mr. Jephson 
is an admirable man, has a handsome fortune, besides large 
expect ations." The whereabouts of this picture is unknown. 

Benjamin Johnstone 

A portrait of this gentleman who was an early organ builder, 
and who married in 1770 Anne Stickney of Newburyport, is 
owned by Mrs. Chas. S. Hanks of Brookline. 

Rev. Joseph Jackson 

There is said to be a portrait of this gentleman by Copley, 
but the author is unaware of its whereabouts. 

William Jones 

A half length picture, representing a young man of nineteen 
or twenty years of age. He is dressed in a gray coat, and in a 
standing attitude. It was in the possession of a relation, — 
Miss Jane Welles, of Boston. 

Judge Woodbury Langdon 

A Judge of the Supreme Court of New Hampshire and a 
brother of Governor John Langdon. The portrait was painted 
about 1775 a very short time before Copley's departure. This 
portrait and also that of Mrs. Langdon hung in Shirley House, 
Roxbury, for fifty years during its occupancy by Mrs. William 
Eustis, widow of Governor Eustis. Prior to this time the por- 
traits hung in the house now known as the Rockingham Hotel at 
Portsmouth, N. H., which house was built by Judge Woodbury 
Langdon as his private residence, the bricks being brought from 



John Singleton Copley 63 

England. These portraits also hung at Wentworth House, 
possibly for only a few years. Copies of these pictures are 
owned by Mrs. Chas. S. Hamlin of Boston, and also by Mrs. 
Anna Parker Pruyn of Albany, N. Y., descendants of Judge 
Langdon, and also one in the Senate Chamber in the New 
Hampshire State House. The original picture is of life size 
and three-quarters length. He is standing, dressed in a rich 
costume of the period — being a coat of brown cloth trimmed 
with gold lace and a green satin waistcoat. The hair is brushed 
back and worn in a queue. The original portrait is owned by 
Woodbury G. Langdon of New York. 

Mrs. Woodbury Langdon 

This is a three-fourths length picture, a companion to that 
of her husband, Judge Langdon. She is standing dressed in 
white satin with a violet scarf around her shoulders. She has 
lace sleeves, and her hair is brushed back. A string of pearls 
is around her neck, while in her arms she holds a quantity of 
loose flowers. Copies of this portrait are owned by Mrs. Chas. 
S. Hamlin of Boston, and by Mrs. Anna Parker Pruyn of Albany, 
N. Y. The original is owned by Woodbury G. Langdon of 
New York. 

Dr. Joseph Lemmon 

Was an eminent physician, a graduate of Harvard College in 
1735. He married for a first wife, a daughter of the Rev. Dr. 
Swett, — a beautiful woman, who died young. His second 
wife was a daughter of General Gookin. He was the great- 
grandfather of General William Raymond Lee. The where- 
abouts of this picture is unknown. 



64 John Singleton Copley 

Lord Lyndhurst, P. C, F. R. S., D. C. L. 

Dunlap says a portrait of his son was painted by Copley in 
1 81 4. The family know nothing of the whereabouts of this 
portrait. John Singleton Copley — Lord Lyndhurst — was 
born in Boston in 1772. In 1776 he joined his father in London. 
He was educated in Trinity College, Cambridge. He entered 
the bar, and soon distinguished himself as a lawyer. He was 
knighted; and as Sir John Copley, he rilled, with great credit to 
himself, the high offices of Chief Justice of Chester, in 181 8; 
Solicitor-general, in 181 9; Attorney-general, in 1824; and Master 
of the Rolls, in 1826. On the retirement of the Earl of Eldon, 
in 1827, he was created Baron Lyndhurst, and constituted Lord 
Chancellor of England. In 1830, his lordship resigned the 
Great Seal; and in 1831 was appointed Lord Chief Baron of 
the Exchequer. In 1834, by a change in the Ministry, he be- 
came Lord Chancellor for the second term, — on which occasion, 
however, he retained the Great Seal but for a short time. In 
the year 1841, he was appointed Lord Chancellor for the third 
time. Lord Lyndhurst, from this period, took an active part 
in the legislation of the country. One of his most intimate 
friends was Lord Chancellor Brougham. He preserved his 
vigor of intellect to the last ; and his great speech, at the age of 
eighty-eight, in the House of Lords, only a short time before his 
death, — which was on the subject of the Navy of Great Brit- 
ain, — was said, at the time, to have equalled, if it did not sur- 
pass, any speech he ever made. He died in 1863. Lord Lynd- 
hurst is also represented as the Red Cross Knight, in the large 
picture owned by his great -niece, Mrs. Gordon Dexter of Boston. 



John Singleton Copley 65 

William Merchant 

Was born in 1752; was one of the four young men who were 
attacked by the soldiers of the British Regiment, just previous 
to the Boston Massacre, the three others being Edward and 
Francis Archibald, and John Leach. Mr. Merchant was also 
one of the number of the famous Tea Party. He was the son 
of William Merchant and Sarah Dennie. The portrait is of a 
child some five years of age, and is of life size, and of more than 
half length. He is dressed in a gray coat and blue waistcoat, 
and has a black ribbon around the neck, with a hat under his 
arm. This picture was painted about 1757, and came through 
Chief Justice Richardson, of New Hampshire, a great-nephew, 
to Mr. French, of Concord, N. H. It has always been in the 
family. 

Judge Henry Marchant 

He was born in 1741; L. L. D. of Yale College in 1792; and 
died in 1796. It was painted by Copley in 179 1. He was 
Attorney-General of Rhode Island, an ardent patriot, a member 
of Congress, and judge of the United States Court. The pic- 
ture is oval in shape. His right hand is open and held against 
his left breast. The picture is owned by Frank E. Marchant 
of West Kingston, R. I. 

Rev. Jonathan Mayhew 

This is a crayon of half size. He is dressed in robes with 
a white wig. He was a prolific writer, an associate of Otis and 
other patriots of the day, and renowned for great learning and 
ability. He was born in 1720, graduated at Harvard College in 
1744, received the degree of S. T. D. from Aberdeen in 1749, 
and died in 1766. 



66 John Singleton Copley 

Mrs. Jonathan Mayhew 

Whose maiden name was Elizabeth Clarke, daughter of Dr. 
John Clarke. It is a three-fourths length portrait. Although a 
belle of the times, she married the Rev. Dr. Mayhew. The 
dress is a white satin robe, with a blue mantle and hat. In her 
right hand she carries a rosebud, while in her left she holds a 
basket of flowers. In the distance is a landscape. 

These two pictures were in the possession of her grandson, 
Peter Wainwright, but were destroyed by the great fire in Boston 
in 1872. 

Hon. James Murray 

Was born August 9, 17 13. The son of John Murray, and 
grandson of Sir James Murray, of Philipshaugh, who was also 
hereditary Sheriff of Selkirkshire and Lord Register, in 1706. 
This James Murray emigrated to North Carolina in 1734, and 
there became a planter and a member of the Council; thence 
he removed to Boston in 1765, and remained until 1776; from 
whence, being a loyalist, he retired to Halifax, where he died in 
1 781. He left two daughters, Elizabeth, who married Edward 
Hutchinson Robbins, and Dorothea, who married the Rev. 
John Forbes. This picture was painted in 1769, when Mr. 
Murray was fifty-seven years of age. It is forty-nine inches 
high by thirty-nine in width. The figure is of life size, seated 
in an armchair. The dress is of black velvet lined with white 
satin ruffles, and a full wig. In his right hand, which rests 
upon a table covered with red cloth, is a parchment scroll. It 
Is in the possession of Mr. James Murray Howe, of Brush Hill, 
Milton. 



John Singleton Copley 67 

Col. John Murray 

Of Rutland. A three-quarters length portrait, four feet one 
inch long by three feet, three inches wide, representing a gen- 
tleman seated. The left hand, which holds a letter, rests on a 
table, on which are books. The right arm is akimbo. The 
coat and waistcoat are of a dark peach color, laced with gold. 
The small clothes are of black velvet, with knee buckles. The 
wig is of iron gray. White silk stockings, white cambric ruffles 
and neckcloth, complete the costume. The picture is in the 
original frame, probably made by Paul Revere, and was owned 
by the Hon. R. L. Hazen, a Senator of New Brunswick, who 
was a great grandson of Colonel Murray, and a resident of 
St. John. 

Mrs. John Murray 

The wife of the Rev. John Murray, was Judith, a sister of 
Governor Sargent. She married for her first husband, John 
Stevens. The picture is of half length and life size, representing 
a very handsome woman richly dressed. Mrs. Murray was an 
authoress, and published both poetry and dramas. It is a very 
fine specimen of Copley's manner, and is owned by Charles S. 
Sargent, of Brookline. 

Mrs. Col. John Murray 

Another picture was owned by the Rev. John Singleton Cop- 
ley Greene, and represents Gardiner Greene, his father, who 
was also her nephew, as a boy standing by her side. This pic- 
ture measures four feet in length by three feet, three inches in 
breadth, and is signed and dated 1763. It represents Mrs. 
Murray standing, leaning with her left arm resting on the sill 
of an open window. Her right hand is lightly clasping her left 



68 John Singleton Copley 

wrist. The dress is of brown satin, cut square in the neck, with 
open hanging sleeves. Both neck and arms are trimmed with 
rich lace. Her hair is combed back from her forehead over a 
high cushion, and falls in long curls upon her shoulders. This 
beautiful picture was in the possession of a great great niece, 
Mrs. John Ware, of South Lancaster, Mass. 

Mrs. Col. John Murray 
Her maiden name was Lucretia Chandler, a daughter of 
Judge John Chandler, of Worcester. Being a celebrated 
beauty of her time, she sat three times to Copley. 

Rebecca Edgel Mifflin 
A three-fourths length picture. She was married in 1750. 
By her side is standing her daughter, Rebecca Mifflin Crane. 
It is owned by Dr. Charles Mifflin, of Boston. 

Samuel Mifflin 
A three-fourths length picture, with a ship in the distance. 
It belongs to Dr. Charles Mifflin, of Boston. 

Mrs. Macpheadris 
The size of this picture is fifty inches long by thirty-nine wide. 
She was the wife of the Hon. Archibald Macpheadris, a mem- 
ber of the King's Council in 1724, and a daughter of Lieut.-Gov- 
ernor John Wentworth. She is represented as sitting, one arm 
resting upon a table. She has a dark complexion, dark hair and 
eyes, and presents a very spirited countenance. Her dress is of 
brown satin, ornamented with jewels and laces. This picture 
hangs in the house built by Archibald Macpheadris in 1721, 
where it has been ever since it was painted. It is in the pos- 
session of a descendant, Miss E. Sherburne of Portsmouth, 
N. H. 



John Singleton Copley 69 

Judge Nymphus Marston 

Was born at Marston Mills in 1728, graduated at Yale College 
in 1749, and died in Boston, while in attendance as a delegate for 
the ratification of the Federal Constitution, in 1788. Judge 
Marston was noted for his learning and patriotism, and was one 
of the principal landowners in Barnstable County. He was 
often called upon and did make large advances towards the 
expenses of the war, as the receipts among his papers show. 
The portrait is of full length, in a sitting position. The dress 
is velvet laced with gold, and silk stockings. The right hand, 
holding a pen, rests upon a table. This fine picture was in the 
possession of his descendant, George Marston, a distinguished 
lawyer of New Bedford, Mass. 

Col. Thomas Marshall 

Who commanded the Tenth Massachusetts Regiment at 
Valley Forge. He was one of the Selectmen of Boston when 
the town was invested by the troops under command of General 
Washington. He at one time commanded at Castle Island, 
now Fort Independence. The size of the portrait is five feet 
long by four wide. It is full length, representing Colonel 
Marshall seated. The costume is a brown velvet suit of the 
time. It is in the possession of the family. 

Mrs. Thomas Marshall 

Was a daughter of Mr. Allen, of Gloucester, and was the sec- 
ond wife of Colonel Thomas Marshall. Her dress is white 
satin, in the fashion of the times, the bodice and sleeves deco- 
rated with lace. Her hair is drawn back over a cushion, and 
ornamented with flowers and lace. This picture was owned 
by John L. Hayes, of Cambridge. 



70 John Singleton Copley 

Judge John Lowell 

Was born in 1743; graduated at Harvard College in 1760, and 
died in 1802. He was Judge of the Court of Appeals in 1783; of 
United States District Court in 1789; and was Chief Justice 
of the Circuit Court for Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and 
Massachusetts. He was distinguished at the bar and upon the 
bench. He is here represented in miniature, most beautifully 
painted, in full white wig, and blue silk figured robe. On the 
back of this miniature there are represented a number of trees 
and a temple; two angels fly over the trees holding a wreath, 
and in the hand of one of them is a torch. This miniature be- 
longed to Mrs. Col. George M. Barnard, a great-granddaughter 
of Judge Lowell. 

Thomas Lewis 

Merchant, was born in Boston, November, 15 1735, and died 
at Marblehead, December 21, 1801, aged sixty-six years. The 
dress is a long coat, with deep cuffs, a long waistcoat, trimmed 
with silver lace, and deep ruffles around the wrists. The posi- 
tion shows the head resting on the right hand, the elbow on a 
ledger. In the left hand is an open letter. An inkstand with 
pen stands on the table. It is in the possession of Lewis John- 
son, Plainfield, N. J. 

Col. Jeremiah Lee 

The father of Col. W. R. Lee of the Continental army. This 
picture is signed with a monogram, and dated 1769. It is eight 
feet in length by five feet in width, and is in the original frame. 
It represents Colonel Lee standing, his left hand resting on a 
table and holding a letter, with his right hand upon his hip. He 



John Singleton Copley 71 

is dressed in a suit of brown velvet, laced with gold, and wears a 
full white wig. From the window there is a landscape view. 
The whole is painted with uncommon care. This picture 
belongs to Robert Ives Lee, and was loaned in 1908 to the 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 

Mrs. Jeremiah Lee 

Her maiden name was Martha Sweet. This a companion 
picture to that of her husband, is signed with a monogram, and 
dated 1769. Mrs. Lee is represented as ascending the steps of 
a terrace, beyond which there is a beautiful landscape, with 
mountains and a river. Her dress is of golden brown satin, 
with a mantle of blue. Over her shoulders she has an ermine 
cape. In the lap of her dress she carries grapes and fruits, 
beautifully painted. Her eyes are black and brilliant. Her 
hair is without powder, and her ornaments are pearls. This 
picture shows marks of great care and study, and is an admirable 
specimen of Copley's manner at that period of his life. It 
belongs to Robert Ives Lee, and was loaned to the Museum of 
the Fine Arts, Boston, in 1908. 

Henry Laurens 

Of Charleston, S. C. He was born in 1724; was President 
of the Provincial Congress in 1774; Minister Plenipotenitary 
to Holland in 1779; signed with Franklin and Jay the prelim 
inaries of the treaty of peace in 1782; and died in 1792. This 
fine picture represents Mr. Laurens seated in a chair, in a court 
dress, wearing a sword. His right hand rests upon a paper on a 
table. The picture was painted in London in 1782, and an 
engraving of it, by a Mr. Green, of London, is now in Massa- 
chusetts Hall, Cambridge, The picture was burned in Charles- 
ton, S. C, in 1 86 1, being owned at the time by John Laurens. 



72 John Singleton Copley 

Jonathan Jackson 

A noted merchant in Newburyport, and a prominent public 
man in his day. A crayon; and one of five portraits of him 
taken by Copley. It is on a sheet of paper, showing the face 
only, which is of life size. It is in the possession of Justice 
O. W. Holmes, Washington, D. C. 

Jonathan Jackson 

Another portrait is an oval, twenty-two inches long by eigh- 
teen inches wide. He wears a white wig with the face turned a 
little in profile. It is in the possession of Mrs. James Jackson, 
Fairfield Street, Boston. 

Jonathan Jackson 

Another picture is a half length, standing, with a landscape 
to the left of him. It is in the artist's later manner, being taken 
in England. It was owned by his granddaughter, Susan Cabot 
Jackson, of Boston. 

Jonathan Jackson 

Another portrait is in oil, of half size, twenty-three inches 
by seventeen. He is dressed in a loose green morning gown, 
trimmed with pink, a ruffled shirt, and has powdered hair. Mr. 
Jackson had this picture painted in 1768, and presented it to his 
sister, Mrs. Wendell, in whose family it now remains. This 
gentleman was the father of Judge Charles, Dr. James and 
Patrick Jackson. One of his daughters married Henry Lee, 
and another Francis C. Lowell. 



John Singleton Copley 73 

Jonathan Jackson 

Another portrait belonged to Henry Lee, of Brookline, a 
grandson of Mr. Jackson. 

Mrs. Jackson 

Wife of Jonathan Jackson. The lady was Hannah, daughter 
of Patrick Tracy, a very distinguished merchant of Newbury- 
port. The portrait is a full face, the hair without powder, but 
decorated with a string of small pearls. It is now owned by 
Mrs. James Jackson, of Boston. 

Dr. Alexander McWhorter and Wife 

Were painted by Copley in 1769 as appears in the accom- 
panying bill but the whereabouts of the portraits is unknown. 

Boston Miss Elizabeth Cummings to John S. Copley. 

1769 To her own portrait f cloth at 7 Guin. £9-16-0 
To Mrs. Maquarter's do. 9-16-0 
To Mr. Maquarter's do. 9-16-0 

1770 To two black frames at 24s. 2-8 



£31-16-0 
Rec'd the contents in full 

pr. John Singleton Copley. 

Mrs. Montague and Robert Copley 

In a letter to her daughter Mrs. Greene in 1804, Mrs. Copley 
mentions these portraits as having been painted on one canvas. 



74 John Singleton Copley 

Lord Mansfield 

This well known picture representing the subject seated in 
his robes of office is in the National Gallery in London. Died 
in London in 1793. 

Mars, Venus and Vulcan 

This allegorical picture by Copley measures twenty-five by 
thirty inches. Vulcan with his anvil and forge, seems engaged 
in making darts, one of which Venus throws at Mars. The 
picture is signed and dated 1754, and is now in the Boston 
Museum of Fine Arts. 

Col. Joseph May 

This picture measures nine inches by twelve. It represents 
a young man dressed in a dark green silk coat, the hair drawn 
back and tied. It is in the possession of Mr. F. A. Pratt, a 
descendant of Concord, Mass. 

Neptune 
This is an allegorical picture, forty-four inches long by twenty- 
seven wide, representing the god, who holds a trident in his 
right hand, and a globe in his left. He is borne upon a shell 
by Nymphs and Tritons. To the shell are attached four sea 
horses, who seem to be guided by a Cupid flying above them, 
holding a dart. A Triton blowing upon a conch shell, brings 
up the rear. This picture was in the possession of Miss Simp- 
son, of Boston, who inherited it from her father, Jonathan 
Simpson, in whose possession it was before Mr. Copley left 
America. There was another smaller picture of the same 
subject, reversed in position, in the possession of Mrs. C. B. 
Raymond, Boston. 



John Singleton Copley 75 

John Newton 

A half length picture of life size, the canvas within the frame 
measuring two feet, three inches long by two feet wide. He 
was Surveyor of his Majesty's Customs in Halifax, N. S., and 
was a grandson of the Hon. Thomas Newton, to whose memory 
a mural tablet is placed in the King's Chapel, Boston. The 
portrait was painted in Boston in 1772, and the date and name 
of the artist are inscribed in a shady corner of the picture. It 
is in very good preservation, and represents a person of perhaps 
fifty years of age, of portly figure and dark complexion. It was 
accounted a perfect likeness. The dress is a coat and waistcoat 
of lead colored cloth, both single breasted, and trimmed with 
gold braid an inch in width. The hair is combed back and tied 
behind. It was in the possession of Mrs. E. A. Newton, of 
Pittsfield, Mass. 

Lord Northampton and Son 

A portrait of Lord Northampton and his son Lord Compton 
on one canvas is said to be in England. It is noticed by Mrs. 
Amory in her life of the artist. 

Mary Otis 

A daughter of James Otis, of Barnstable; a sister of James 
Otis, the patriot; of Samuel Allyne Otis (the father of Harrison 
Gray Otis), and of Mercy Otis, who married James Warren. 
She married John Gray. The picture is of three-fourths length, 
and was painted in 1757. She is dressed in blue satin, with 
lace and pearl ornaments about the waist and in the hair. A 
scarf or robe hangs from the left shoulder. This picture is 
owned by Pelham W. Warren, of New York. 



76 John Singleton Copley 

Dr. Ogilvie 

Copley painted a portrait of Dr. Ogilvie in New York, in 
1773. It is now in the possession of Trinity Church, New York. 

Daniel Oliver 

A brother of Andrew Oliver. Daniel Oliver died young. 
This picture is a miniature, in the possession of Mrs. George F. 
Crane, nee Oliver, of New York. 

Hon. Andrew Oliver, Jr. 

Was born in 1731, graduated at Harvard College in 1749, and 
died in Salem in 1799. He married the eldest daughter of Chief 
Justice Lynde; was one of the Judges of the Court of Common 
Pleas for Essex, and the author of an " Essay on Comets." The 
picture is four inches long by four wide, representing Judge 
Oliver in a light gray coat and full wig. It is owned by Mrs. 
George F. Crane, nee Oliver, New York. 

Oliver 

There are said to be two portraits of the Oliver family that 
were at Middleborough, Mass.; their present whereabouts are 
unknown. 

Chief Justice Peter Oliver 

He was a brother of Lieut.-Governor Andrew Oliver and 
was Chief Justice in 177 1. He was a loyalist, and distinguished 
as a writer, orator, and poet. He was born in 1713, graduated 
at Harvard College in 1730, received the degree of J. C. D. from 
Oxford University in 1776, and died in England in 1791. This 
picture is an oval miniature, on copper about five inches long 



John Singleton Copley 77 

by four inches wide, and represents Judge Oliver in a brown 
coat and full wig. He married in 1733, a daughter of William 
Clarke. This picture is in the possession of Mrs. Geo. F. 
Crane, of New York. 

Lieut. -Governor Andrew Oliver 

Was born in 1707, graduated at Harvard College in 1724, 
was Lieutenant-Governor in 1770, was a determined loyalist, 
and died in Boston in 1774. He is represented in a brown coat 
and full wig. This is a companion picture to the portrait of 
Judge Oliver, and is also in the possession of Mrs. Geo. F. Crane, 
of New York. 

The Offer of the Crown to Lady Jane Grey 

This large and important picture contains the portraits of 
the Dukes of Northumberland and Suffolk, and other deputies 
of the Privy Council. It was exhibited in 1808 at the Royal 
Academy, was sold at the Lyndhurst sale in 1864. A copy is 
now owned by Mrs. Gordon Dexter, of Boston. 

Henry Pelham 

An unfinished portrait of Henry Pelham is owned by Mrs. 
Gordon Dexter, of Boston. 

Sir William Pepperell 

This is a pastel portrait of the younger Sir Wm. Pepperell, 
who died in London in 1816. It measures eleven by thirteen 
inches, and is owned by Everett P. Wheeler, of New York. He 
is dressed in blue coat with lace at the throat. It measures 
eight by ten inches. 



78 John Singleton Copley 

Col. Benjamin Pickman 

This picture is of life size, measures four feet, two inches long 
by three feet, four inches in width. He was born at Salem, 
November 18, 1740, and graduated at Harvard College in 1759. 
He was a merchant, and spent some years during the Revolution- 
ary War in England. Colonel Pickman is referred to by John 
Adams while there, as "the agreeable Mr. Pickman." He 
returned to Salem at the close of the war, and held important 
offices in the town until near the end of his life. He married 
Mary Toppan, daughter of Bezaleel Toppan, and granddaughter 
of the Rev. Christopher Toppan, of Newbury, in 1762. Col- 
onel Pickman died May 12, 1819. In the portrait he appears 
in a dark slate-colored suit, with a red waistcoat. The coat is 
cut single-breasted, with large pockets in the skirts, and but- 
toned at the waist with two buttons, and at the throat with one. 
He stands with one hand resting on a book, and the other on 
his hip. It is owned by Senator Wetmore, of Rhode Island. 

Mrs. Pickman 

Was born in 1774, and died in 181 7. In her portrait she 
appears in a blue satin dress, with low neck, and short, wide 
sleeves. The whole is deeply trimmed with white lace. She 
has a small bouquet on her head — put above the forehead — 
and bears in her hand a large, open parasol. The picture is a 
very striking one, the drapery being particularly fine. On a 
pillar, against which Mrs. Pickman stands, is inscribed, J. S. 
Copley, 1762. It is owned by Senator Wetmore, of Rhode 
Island. 



John Singleton Copley 79 

Mrs. Anna Dummer Powell 

Was the wife of John Powell, of Boston, and sister of Gov- 
ernor Dummer. The picture is of life size, and three-quarters 
length, representing a lady in extreme old age, sitting in a large 
easy chair, covered with velvet She is dressed in black satin, 
and has a white muslin cap. A square white handkerchief is 
crossed in front around her neck. One hand holds a book, and 
the other hangs over the arm of the chair. The picture is care- 
fully painted, and the characteristics of old age are well brought 
out. It is in the possession of Miss A. P. Rogers, of Boston, 
and a duplicate is owned by Francis C. Loring. 

Rev. Jonathan Parsons 

Was minister of the first Presbyterian Church in Newburyport, 
and celebrated for his virtues, his learning, and his eloquence. 
He wears a large white wig puffed at the sides, a black silk 
robe and bands, and holds a Bible in front of him. The picture 
shows only the head and shoulders. The features are strong 
and prominent. A copy of this painting hangs in the Old South 
Church, Newburyport, Mass. The portrait is in the possession 
of his great grandson, H. E. Parsons, of Ashtabula, O. 

Pierpont 

The picture represents a child of this family, about four years 
old, sitting upon the floor and caressing with its left hand a 
spaniel dog. The eyes are dark, but the hair, which is partly 
covered by a cap, is light. The dress is white, and one leg, 
which is bare from the knee down, is very well drawn. The 
portrait is thirty-three inches long, and twenty-six inches wide, 
and was in the possession of a descendant of the family, Mrs. 
William Vincent Hutchings, of Roxbury. 



80 John Singleton Copley 

Mrs. Edmund Perkins 

Was Esther, daughter of William and Esther Frothingham, of 
Charlestown. She was born in 1695, and married Edmund 
Perkins, in 1722. She was the grandmother of James Perkins, 
Thomas Handasyde Perkins, Samuel G. Perkins, and of their 
sisters, Mrs. Russell Sturgis, Mrs. Robert Cushing, Mrs. Ralph 
Bennett Forbes, and Mrs. Benjamin Abbott. The picture is 
of half length, representing an old lady dressed in a white cap, 
with black trimmings and a white shawl. The countenance is 
remarkable for the thoughtful charm of its expression, wonder- 
fully rendered, and its fine intellectual character, age as not yet 
having destroyed the original regularity of the features, which 
in youth were said to have been of great beauty. The tradition 
is that it was painted by Copley for her stepson, Henry Perkins. 
It was owned in 1906 by Mr. J. B. Fuller, of Brighton. 

Henry Pelham 

He was the half brother of John Singleton Copley; and this 
portrait, well known as "The Boy with the Squirrel," was se- 
lected to be sent to England, for exhibition at Somerset House. 
The letter did not arrive until too late. Mr. West, to whom it 
was consigned, knew it to be the work of an American artist, 
from the squirrel, and also from the wood on which the canvas 
was stretched. The rule was to admit no pictures without the 
artist's name, but on this occasion it was dispensed with; and 
Mr. Copley was advised to go to England in consequence of the 
favor with which the picture was received. The boy is seated 
at a table, his right hand holding a chain to which the squirrel 
is attached, who sits on the table cracking a nut. A glass of 
water is near him. The boy is dressed in a dark blue coat with 



John Singleton Copley 81 

a red collar, and a yellow waistcoat; a white collar, and frills 
at his wrists; there is red drapery behind. The picture is 
thirty inches long by twenty-four wide, and is in the possession 
of Frederic Amory, of Boston. 

Charles Pelham 

The size of this picture is thirty-six inches long by twenty- 
eight wide. The dress is a drab coat and flowered waistcoat. 
A table stands in the background. Charles Pelham was born 
in 172(F), and was a stepbrother of Copley; the picture is the 
earliest one known by the artist, he being at that time not far 
from fourteen years of age. The coloring is quite good, but the 
background is somewhat out of drawing. It is now owned by 
C. P. Curtis, of Boston. 

Mrs. Pringle 

A full-length portrait, dressed in gray silk. At the waist is 
a blue bow. One foot is advanced. It is said to be a very beau- 
tiful picture, and was in the possession of William Bull Pringle, 
of Charleston, S. C. 

William Pepperell and his Sister 

William Pepperell, the son of the second Sir William Pep- 
perell, and Elizabeth Royal, his wife, was born in the family 
mansion, but was taken to England with his sisters, in 1774. 
It was hoped that he would live to inherit his father's title, 
but he died at the Isle of Wight in 1809, unmarried. The pic- 
ture represents him as a youth standing in a park; by his side is 
his sister, Elizabeth Royal Pepperell, afterward married to the 
Rev. Henry Hutton. This picture was painted in England, and 
afterwards sent to this country, to Mr. Sparhawk, by whom it 



82 John Singleton Copley 

was presented to the Portsmouth Museum, from whom it was 
bought by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, of Cambridge, in 
whose family it now remains. 

Samuel Quincy 

This picture is of life size, and more than half length, and is 
in the original carved frame. Mr. Quincy is dressed in wig, 
gown, and bands, with ruffles on his wrists. He is seated by a 
table, pen in hand, and manuscripts lie by his side. He was 
born in 1735, and graduated at Harvard College in 1754; he 
was Solicitor-general for the Province, in that capacity prose- 
cuting the soldiers for the Boston Massacre. His brother, 
Josiah Quincy, Jr., was counsel for the defense. On account 
of his royalist principles he left the country in 1775, and never 
returned. He died in 1789, and was buried at Bristol, England. 
The picture is owned by his great grandson, Quincy Phillips, 
of Cambridge. 

Mrs. Samuel Quincy 
This is a companion picture to that of her husband. She is 
dressed in rose colored brocade, with loose sleeves, trimmed 
with lace, and a lace cape, and wears a dark velvet hat with a 
white feather, and in one hand has a sprig of larkspur. Her 
maiden name was Hannah Hill; she died in 1783. This pic- 
ture is now in the possession of her great grandson, Quincy 
Phillips, of Cambridge. 

Josiah Quincy 
Of Braintree, was painted by John Singleton Copley, in 1769. 
The size is half length. It represents Mr. Quincy at the age of 
sixty years, in the dress of the period; a powdered wig, a claret- 
colored coat and waistcoat, with wrought gold buttons, a plain 



John Singleton Copley 83 

cravat, tight around the throat, with richly embroidered muslin 
ruffles at the bosom and wrists. He is seated in a carved 
mahogany chair, holding in his left hand a book, while his right 
arm rests upon a table covered with green cloth. Two of the 
fingers of the right hand are between the leaves of the book, as 
if to keep his place while he speaks. " President John Adams 
used to say, that the portrait was so admirable and life-like, 
that it seemed as if his old friend must rise to bid him welcome." 
Josiah Quincy was born in Braintree, Mass., in 1709; graduated 
at Harvard College in 1728. He was a distinguished merchant, 
and a much valued correspondent of Slingsby Bethel, — Lord 
Mayor of London. He established the first glass and sper- 
maceti works in America. He was an intimate friend of Frank- 
lin, Bowdoin, and President John Adams, — who used to de- 
scribe him as remarkable for the elegance of his manner, and 
the grace of his address. He was a strenuous patriot, and lived 
to see the freedom of the Colonies, dying in 1784. In 1770, 
he erected the mansion house, — built upon the lands granted 
to the family in 1635, and which was the summer residence of 
President Quincy, his grandson. This portrait is in the pos- 
session of the family. 

Mrs. Daniel Rogers 

She was Elizabeth, daughter of Col. John Gorham; born 
December 10, 1739; married Daniel Rogers November 6, 1759; 
died March 14, 1769. The picture is three-fourths length, and 
represents the lady in a satin dress with a hat hanging from her 
arm. She seems to be coming from a garden. It is now owned 
by Miss Louisa Low, of Stamford, Conn. This picture is 
signed and dated 1762, and is at the country home of Miss Low 
at Pelham Manor, New York. 



84 John Singleton Copley 

Judge Chambers Russell 

An oval picture, representing the figure in the red robes and 
the wig of an English judge. He was born in 17 13; graduated 
from Harvard College in 17.31; and died in 1767. He was 
Judge of the Superior Court, and also a Judge of Admiralty. 
It is in the possession of his descendant, Col. Charles R. Codman. 

Mrs. Abigail Rogers 

The wife of Daniel Denison Rogers, of Boston, was the second 
child of Henry Bromfield, and Margaret his wife, nee Fair- 
weather. She was born in 1763, and married in 1791. While 
residing in Europe, this portrait was painted by Copley, her 
half uncle. It is of life size, three-fourths length, and represents 
a lady out for a walk, and just drawing on her glove. She is 
dressed in white satin, with a white muslin mantle over shoul- 
ders. Her hair is powdered, and her hat, which has a wide fall 
of lace around the rim, and a large mass of dark red ribbon on 
the crown, is surmounted by white plumes. Near where she 
stands is the trunk of a tree, and in the distance is a mountain- 
ous country and a gorgeous sky. A copy of this, possibly by 
Copley, is owned by Mrs. W. C. Cabot, of Boston. The original 
is in the possession of Miss A. P. Rogers, of Boston. 

Mrs. Lucy Rogers 

A daughter of Thomas Boylston, and wife of Rogers. 

An oil portrait, shown at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in 
1905, and belonging to the estate of Louisa C. A. Nightingale. 



John Singleton Copley 85 



Rogers 



This fine picture represents Mr. Rogers sitting sideways 
upon a chair. His dress is a plum colored coat, and a gold 
laced waistcoat. His hair is without powder. It is in the pos- 
session of Morrill Wyman, of Cambridge. 

John Richards 

Of New London, Conn., son of John and Ann Prentice Rich- 
ards, and grandson of John Richards, who emigrated from 
Wales, and died in New London in 1687. Mr. Richards was 
born in 1736; graduated at Yale College in 1757. Having 
inherited a handsome fortune, he followed no profession. He 
married for his first wife, July 5, 1755, Susannah Grey; for his 
second wife, he married, June 6, 1768, Catharine Saltonstall, a 
daughter of Governor Saltonstall. The size of the picture is 
two feet, two inches high by two feet wide. The dress is an 
open coat, with wrought gold buttons, a brown waistcoat, and 
muslin cravat. The face is that of a fine looking man, of florid 
complexion, black hair, and large, dark eyes. This picture was 
in the possession of a relative of the family, Mr. George Richards 
Lewis, of New London, Conn. 

The Red Cross Knight 

The scene is taken from Spencer's "Faerie Queene." On 
the right of the picture is Lord Lyndhurst as a young man, 
dressed in full armor, advancing into a garden; next him stands 
his sister, Mrs. Greene, and beyond her is Miss Mary Copley. 
The figures of the ladies are very charming. The picture, 
which is large, was painted about 1789, and is in the possession 
of a great g randdaughter of Mr. Copley, Mrs. Gordon Dexter. 



86 John Singleton Copley 

Paul Revere 

This picture is twenty-eight inches long by twenty-five in 
width, and represents the patriot leaning on a table, and without 
a coat. He wears a white shirt and blue waistcoat. His hair 
is without powder. The right hand supports the chin, while the 
left holds a silver teapot. Engraving tools are scattered upon 
the table. Colonel Revere was a descendant of a Huguenot 
family; was born in 1735, and died in 1818. In 1756 he was a 
Lieutenant of Artillery, stationed at Fort Edward, near Lake 
George. On his return to Boston, he established himself as an 
engraver and goldsmith. In 1775 he engraved the plates for 
the paper money ordered by Congress, and was also a successful 
manufacturer of gunpowder. In 1779 he served in the Penob- 
scot Expedition; and afterwards was a Colonel of Artillery, 
Grand Master of Freemasons, and first President of the Massa- 
chusetts Charitable Association. The picture now belongs to 
Mrs. John Revere, of Canton, Mass. 

Mrs. Daniel Re a 

A fine picture of three-fourths length, which was in the pos- 
session of Mrs. Thompson, of Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Katharine Russell 

The wife of Judge James Russell, of Charlestown, and 
daughter of Hon. Thomas Graves. She was born in 171 7, and 
died in 1778. The size of the picture is four feet long by four 
and a quarter feet wide. The dress is light brown satin, with 
a white lawn cape, and long mittens on the hands and arms. 
The figure is seated in an arm-chair, and holds in one hand a 
book. It is in the possession of Henry R. Dalton, of Boston. 



John Singleton Copley 87 

Mrs. Eliza Whiting Richards 

There is a portrait of this lady by Copley owned by her great 
granddaughter, Miss Martha D. Wilson, of Wakefield, Mass. 

Col. Epes Sargent, Sr. 

This picture is forty-nine inches in length by thirty-nine in 
width, and is in a simple gilt frame, three inches wide; it is of 
two-thirds length. It represents a vigorous old gentleman, 
about sixty or seventy years of age, in an attitude of repose; 
the right elbow on the base of a column, the left hand thrust 
into his side pocket, while the right is spread on his chest, pre- 
senting the entire back of the hand to view. He is dressed in a 
large, single-breasted coat of drab broadcloth, fitting loosely, 
buttoned up to the throat, without collar, but with full, long 
cuffs, narrow white muslin neckcloth, and broad white lawn 
ruffies surrounding the wrists, while a strip of gold lace from 
the inner vest lightens the lower part of the costume. The 
round, full face is in nearly front view, with small, blue, laugh- 
ing eyes, straight nose, a high, broad forehead, and rather thin 
lips. Upon the head is a light, curling, powdered wig, just 
reaching the shoulders, upon which the powder has fallen. A 
tree in the distance. The date of this picture is not known; 
probably previous to 1760. Mr. Sargent was born in Glouces- 
ter in 1690 and was the sixth child of William Sargent and 
Mary Duncan. He married first, Esther MacCarty, of Rox- 
bury; and second, the widow Brown of Salem, a grand- 
daughter of Gov. Joseph Dudley, and daughter of John Win- 
throp. After his second marriage he removed to Salem, where 
he died in 1762. He held a Colonel's commission under King 
George II., and had three sons, Epes, Daniel, and Winthrop; 



88 John Singleton Copley 

and two daughters, Esther, who married Thomas Goldthwait, 
and Sarah, who married Colonel Allen, : — by his first wife; and 
two sons, John and Paul Dudley, by his second. This portrait 
is owned by Mrs. G. H. Clements. 

Epes Sargent, Jr. 

This picture is of three-fourths length, measuring forty-nine 
inches long by thirty-nine in width, in a boldly carved frame, 
similar to that of his wife, and was probably painted in 1764. 
He is represented standing, with a slender, erect figure, dressed 
in a single-breasted coat, and waistcoat of drab broadcloth, 
quite long, without collar. The waistcoat is buttoned te the 
throat, the coat being open. The cuffs are very long, much 
wider than the sleeves, and held back by three large buttons; a 
white muslin neckcloth is tied in a simple bow, and the end 
tucked into the waistcoat. The short sleeves terminate in 
broad lawn ruffles. His right elbow rests on the square base 
of a column, with the hand hanging easily in front. The fluted 
shaft of the column appears at the upper corner, but most of it 
is concealed by the broad, heavy folds of a maroon curtain, 
which forms the background of the upper part of the picture. 
The left hand just touches the top of a balustrade. A full 
powdered wig covers the head. The features are delicate and 
regular. It is in the later style of the painter, and is a charming 
portrait. He was born in Gloucester in 1720, the eldest child 
of Epes Sargent and Esther MacCarty. He married Cath- 
arine Osborne of Boston in 1745, and was very distinguished 
as a merchant ; a man of strong religious tendencies, he remained 
a loyalist during the Revolution, although his sons took the side 
of the Colonies. His devotion to what he considered to be his 



John Singleton Copley 89 

duty to his king, brought upon him great pecuniary losses, 
which he bore with singular fortitude. He died in 1779. This 
portrait is owned by Mrs. G. H. Clements. 

Mrs. Epes Sargent, Jr. 

Who was Catharine Osborne; companion picture. The por- 
trait is of a lady of fine figure and considerable beauty. She is 
represented as standing, apparently waiting to mount her horse, 
very erect, but perfectly easy. A stone building, the wall of 
which is broken by an entablature, and the base and shaft of a 
column, occupy two-thirds of the background on the right hand. 
By her side on the left, the water of a fountain is falling into and 
over part of a fluted basin of dark marble, supported by scrolls 
terminated by the head of some heraldic animal; in the distance 
a tree, and the sky appears beyond, broken by a few clouds 
reflecting the sunlight. She is dressed in a bluegreen riding 
habit of thick camlet or poplin, consisting of a long-waisted 
jacket with an underskirt of the same material falling in very 
full and bold folds below. The neck and sleeves are relieved 
by a broad collar and cuffs of white satin, and the whole trimmed 
with gold lace and gilt buttons; white muslin ruffles surround 
the throat and wrists, the former being confined by a black 
ribbon. Her dark brown hair is combed back from a high 
forehead, with a small pink bow at the top of the head. Her 
ungloved hands, which are beautifully and elaborately painted, 
are crossed in an easy manner in front of her, the right one hold- 
ing a riding whip, which rests on her shoulder, while a long 
white ribbon hangs from the handle. A black satin riding cap, 
trimmed with black lace and adorned with a fine long white 
ostrich feather, hangs lightly from her left hand in front. The 
picture is marked with Copley's autograph and the date of 1764. 



90 John Singleton Copley 

Mrs. Sargent was born in 1722, the fifth child of Hon. John 
Osborn, one of the Governor's Council, and Sarah Woodbury. 
Her father was born in Bristol, R. I., removed to Boston, and 
subsequently married Madame Hutchinson, Madame Fitch, 
and Miss Pierce. He died in 1768. Mrs. Sargent was married 
in 1745. It is said of her that her portrait is but a faint indica- 
tion of the still more beautiful memories which she left with all 
who knew her. This portrait is owned by Mrs. G. H. Clements. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Stevens 

A daughter of Joseph Aleen, and married in 1733, t0 Mr. 
William Stevens, of Gloucester. It is of three-fourths length, 
and is in Copley's early manner. The lady is dressed in rose- 
colored satin, and is standing. It is in the possession of Mrs. 
Edward Russell, of Boston. 

Earl of Sidmouth 

There is in England a three-quarter length portrait of this 
nobleman. He is represented in a standing position, sleeves 
heavily ornamented with gold lace and holds a scroll with both 
hands. He wears a white wig. 

Mrs. Startin 

Was Sarah Clarke, a sister of the artist's wife. The portrait 
is in oil but not finished, and represents only the head and neck 
of the lady. She wears a large hat. This portrait and the one 
of Mrs. Spinner were bought by Mr. George Henry Timmins, 
a great nephew of Lord Lyndhurst, at the sale of that noble- 
man's pictures, and are now in Milan, Italy. It belonged to 
the late Martin Brimmer, of Boston. 



John Singleton Copley 91 

Mrs. W. S. Smith 

In regard to this painting, Mr. Charles Francis Adams says : 
"This picture was a portrait of the only daughter of John 
Adams, who married Col. W. S. Smith, of New York, then 
Secretary of Legation to Mr. Adams in London, and died in 
1 81 3. It must have been taken somewhere about the year 1787. 
It belonged to her brother, John Quincy, and was by him given 
to Mrs. Smith's only daughter, Mrs. De Windt, of Fishkill, 
Dutchess County, N. Y. It was a remarkably attractive picture, 
but unfortunately it was destroyed in a conflagration, which 
took place a few years since, of the mansion of Mr. De Windt." 
Mr. Charles F. Adams also has a miniature copy of this. 

Judge Richard Saltonstall 

This picture is four feet, two inches long, by three feet, four 
inches wide, and of three-fourths length. The dress is a brown 
velvet coat, a long blue velvet waistcoat, extending to the bottom 
of the picture, with a rich gold lace border around the edges 
of the pockets. The sleeves are loose, with large ruffles around 
the hand. The right hand is resting on the hip, the left extend- 
ing in an attitude of speaking, or addressing an assembly. It 
is a dignified and pleasing picture. Judge Saltonstall was 
born in Haverhill, June 24, 1703; graduated at Harvard Col- 
lege in 1722, and died October 20, 1756. He was Judge of the 
Superior Court from 1736 until his death. At the age of twenty- 
three he received a commission as Colonel. He was noted for 
his elegant hospitality, his eloquence, and noble, generous char- 
acter, and was a learned and accomplished jurist. It is owned 
by R. M. Saltonstall, of Brookline. 



Q2 John Singleton Copley 

Mrs. Smelt 
An early example of the artist's work showing a light-haired 
lady, dressed in blue satin, three-quarters length, measuring 
size forty inches by fifty inches. It is in its original carved 
frame and is signed and dated 1756. 

Samuel Phillips Savage 
The portrait of this gentleman is now owned by Mr. John 
Richard Savage, of Garden City, Long Island. 

Mrs. Sarah Savage 

This lady was the wife of Samuel Phillips Savage, and the 
portrait is now owned by Mr. Samuel S. Shaw, of Boston. The 
following is the copy of the bill for the portraits. 

Boston, December 1st, 1764. 

Received of Samuel Phillips Savage, Esq., Six pounds, thir- 
teen shillings and four pence, which is the balance in full for 
two portraits, one of his Lady, the other of himself. 

John S. Copley. 

Lord Spencer 

Copley painted a full length portrait of Lord Spencer in 
Highland Costume. Engraved by Dunkarton. 

Gov. George Scott 

This portrait supposed to have been painted about 1755 is an 
excellent example of the period. Governor Scott ruled the 
Dominican Islands. He was an intimate friend of General 
Winslow, Commissary General of the Continental Army and 
to whom he presented this portrait. General Scott married 



John Singleton Copley 93 

Miss Erving of Boston, daughter of Hon. John Erving. He 
is represented as an officer in red and buff, standing three- 
quarters length with musket, powder, horn and belt at the side 
and hat under the right arm. The picture measures forty inches 
by fifty inches and is in its original carved frame. It is owned 
by "The Brook," of New York City. 

Mrs. Scott 

She was the wife of Gov. George Scott of Dominica, and the 
daughter of Hon. John Erving, of Boston. She died in 1768 
at Dominica. The picture is in the possession of J. Langdon 
Erving, of New York. 

Surrender of Admiral De Winter 

This large and important picture of the surrender of the 
Dutch Admiral De Winter to Lord Duncan in 1797 is now in 
the National Gallery. The picture was engraved by Ward. It 
contains portraits of Lord Duncan, Admiral De Winter, Capt. 
Sir W. Fairfax, and the officers of H. M. S. "Venerable." The 
action is supposed to be closed and Lord Duncan is seen on 
the deck of the "Venerable" surrounded by his officers. An 
English sailor in the foreground bearing the enemy's colors. 

St. Jerome, after Correggio 

A tine copy of this celebrated picture at Parma was a com- 
mission from Lord Grosvenor and was painted by Copley at 
Parma in 1775. It sold at the Lyndhurst sale in 1864 for fifty- 



94 John Singleton Copley 

Seige of Gibraltar 

This important picture is now in the room of the Council of 
London. It was painted 1 789-1 790, and engraved by Sharp. 
It contains portraits of Major General De La Motte, Colonel 
Duchenhausen, Colonel Schleppengull, Colonel Hugo and 
others. A sketch for this picture was sold at the Lyndhurst 
sale in 1864. 

Samuel and Eli 

The well-known picture which was engraved by Valentine 
Green for Macklin's Bible, and which sold in London at auction 
in 1864 by the executors of Lord Lyndhurst for 105 pounds 
was destroyed by fire, while in the house of Mr. Henry Graves 
in London in 1867. 

Ebenezer Storer 

A colored crayon of half length, twenty-three inches long by 
seventeen wide. He was a merchant of Boston, was born in 
1699, and died in 1761. The dress is a green damask robe and 
green velvet cap. This picture is now owned by Mr. W. Smith 
Carter, of New York. 

Ebenezer Storer 

Son of Ebenezer and Mary Edwards Storer. A portrait in 
the possession of Harvard College. 

Mrs. Mary Storer 

A half length crayon. The dress is of silk, with a black 
lace shawl and a cap of black lace with a white border. The 
following inscription is on the back of the portrait: "Died 
December 8, 1771, Mrs. Mary Storer, widow of the late Eben- 



John Singleton Copley 95 

ezer Storer, aged seventy-two. This portrait was taken two 
years before her death." It is now owned by a descendant, 
Miss G. G. Eaton, of Boston. 

Mrs. Mary (Edwards) Storer 
The wife of Ebenezer Storer; she was born in 1700, and died 
in 1 77 1. The dress is of black silk, with a white muslin hand- 
kerchief crossed over the neck and covered with black lace; a 
close fitting cap completes the costume. This portrait is in the 
possession of Mr. W. Smith Carter, of New York. 

Mrs. Robert Stevens 
Whose maiden name was Anstice Elizabeth Wignell, was born 
in Antigua in 1722, married in 1738, and died in 1790. The 
picture is of life size, and represents a lady handsomely attired 
in the costume of the times. It is in the possession of a descend- 
ant, Miss J. R. Stevens, of Wrentham, Mass. 

Mrs. Skinner 
This is a highly finished portrait, representing a lady seated, 
her head resting on her hand. The hair is without powder, and 
is drawn back over a cushion. The picture is signed, "John 
Singleton Copley, pinxit, 1772, Boston." It is in the Museum 
of the Fine Arts, Boston. 

Isaac Smith 
A merchant of Boston. It is an oil painting of full length, 
four feet long by three feet, three inches wide. He was bora in 
1 7 19, and died in 1787. He is represented as seated at a table 
with writing materials, and is dressed in a plum-colored coat, 
small clothes, and a full wig. It is in the original frame. It 
was painted in 1 769, and now belongs to Mr. W. Smith Carter, 
of New York. 



96 John Singleton Copley 

Elizabeth Storer Smith 

This is a companion picture to that of Isaac Smith, her hus- 
band. She was born in 1727, and died in 1786. She is rep- 
resented as attired in a blue satin under dress, and an open crim- 
son sacque. Her sleeves reach to the elbow, with white ruffles, 
and she holds in her hand a bunch of grapes. This is a very 
fine portrait, and is owned by Mr. W. Smith Carter, of New 
York. 

Mrs. George Spooner 

Her maiden name was Phcebe, the daughter of John and 
Anna Vassall Borland. A miniature representing a pretty 
young woman of sixteen years of age, which was taken the year 
before her marriage. There is no tradition as to the author of 
this miniature, but from the similarity of it to others of his works 
of this kind, there can be but little doubt that it was painted by 
Copley. The picture was in the possession of a niece, Miss 
Simpson, of Boston. 

Col. Nathaniel Sparhawk 

Was the son of Rev. John Sparhawk, of Bristol, R. I., who 
died in 17 18. His mother was afterwards married to Jonathan 
Waldo, a prominent merchant of Boston, by whom he was edu- 
cated. May 1, 1742, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir 
William Pepperell. The size of this picture is ninety inches 
long by fifty-eight in width, and represents a gentleman dressed 
in rose-colored velvet. The right hand is in the pocket, the left 
holds a scroll. It is signed "J. S. Copley, 1764." The figure 
leans in an easy attitude against a pillar. Behind is a stairway 
ornamented with a vase, and beyond this an arch with statues 
and a landscape. This portrait belonged to Mr. F. R. Rindge, 
Cambridge, Mass. 



John Singleton Copley 97 

Colonel Sparhawk 

Another portrait, twenty-eight by thirty-six, belonging to 
Mr. Everett P. Wheeler, of New York, was shown in the Hud- 
son-Fulton Exhibition in 1909. 

Mrs. Nathaniel Sparhawk 

Was Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Pepperell. The size 
of this picture is twenty-six inches long by twenty-one inches 
wide. The dress is a pearl-colored silk, with a white scarf over 
one shoulder. There are pearl ornaments in her hair and about 
her neck. The portrait was in the possession of her great grand- 
daughter, Mrs. Hampden Cutts, of Brattleboro, Vt. 

Andrew Sigourney 

Was born in 1702, and was the son of Andrew Sigourney and 
Mary Germaine, his wife. He married in 1731, Mary, only 
daughter of Dr. John Ronchon, and died in 1772. His portrait, 
which is of three-quarters length, represents him as seated, and 
is that of a middle aged man, dressed in the costume of the times. 
His left hand rests on a long staff. This picture was in the pos- 
session of Mrs. Ross, of Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Andrew Sigourney 

Died in 1772. Her portrait, which is of three-quarters 
length, represents her as a fine looking woman of about forty 
years of age. She is seated. Her hair, which is dark and very 
thick, is drawn off from her forehead, and hangs in a heavy 
mass down her back. She wears no ornaments. Her right 
hand rests in her lap, while with her left she seems to be fasten- 
ing her bodice. This picture was owned by Mrs. Ross, of 
Hartford, Conn. 



98 John Singleton Copley 

Sir Roger Sheafe 

Was born in Boston in 1760. At the evacuation of Boston in 
1776 he accompanied Earl Percy, afterward the Duke of North- 
umberland, by whom he was adopted, to England. There he 
was educated as a soldier, and rose rapidly in rank. In 181 2 
he was Major-general in the British Army, and was stationed 
in Canada. Finding a collision with his own countrymen in- 
evitable, he earnestly solicited employment elsewmere. His 
request w T as not granted, and commanding his troops at the 
battle of Queenstown Heights, he took Gen. Winfield Scott and 
his brigade prisoners of war, for which service he was created a 
baronet of the United Kingdom. He married a niece of Sir 
Isaac Coffin, and died in 1850. His portrait represents him as 
sitting in a chair, dressed in a brown coat and a laced cravat; 
the hair powdered. The picture is a half length, and is a beau- 
tiful specimen of Copley's latest manner. It was in the pos- 
session of Mrs. Henry Loring, of Brookline, a niece of the 
Baronet. 

Mrs. John Scollay 
A crayon, which was owned by Dr. Jacob Bigelow. 

John Scollay 

A portrait of life size, representing a portly man, with wig 
and plain brown dress, sitting with his hand resting on a ledger, 
near which is an inkstand and a pen. He was chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen of Boston from 1774 to 1790. This picture 
was in the possession of Dr. Jacob Bigelow, whose wife was a 
granddaughter of John Scollay. 



John Singleton Copley 99 

Mrs. Dorothy Quincy Scott 

First married John Hancock at Fairfield, Conn., in 1775, 
afterwards Mr. Scott, in 1789, and died in 1829, aged 82. The 
portrait is of three-fourths length, and represents the lady sit- 
ting in a chair. Her hand is raised to her face. A rich dress 
of pink brocade, a velvet band around the neck, and a muslin 
apron, complete the costume. It now hangs in the Museum of 
Fine Arts, Boston, and belongs to Stephen Bowen. 

Colonel Scott 

This picture is of three-fourths length. The figure is seated, 
with the right elbow resting upon a table, and the hand sup- 
ported by a book. The left leg is crossed over the right knee. 
The coat is brown, with a richly embroidered waistcoat, and in 
the shirt is a breast pin. The countenance is exceedingly 
intelligent and commanding. This picture belongs to George 
S. Winslow, of Boston. 

Mrs. Olney Scott 

This is a companion picture to that of Colonel Scott, and 
represents a lady near a table, holding in her left hand a bunch 
of sweet peas. Her dress is of dark pink, and her right hand is 
raised, grasping the folds of a mantle. This picture is in the 
possession of George S. Winslow, of Boston. 

Eleazer Tyng 

The picture is six feet long by four feet wide. He was born 
in 1690, and died in 1775. He owned a large tract of land on 
the Merrimac River, to which he subsequently gave the name of 
Tyngsborough. The portrait is dated in 1772. It is a full 



ioo John Singleton Copley 

length likeness of a venerable gentleman, and represents him 
sitting, as old men do, in the attitude of perfect rest. His coun- 
tenance is benignant. The dress is a drab coat and small 
clothes with black stockings, and he wears a full wig. It is a 
very highly finished picture. Eleazer Tyng was the grandson 
of Edward Tyng, 1630, whose daughter Rebecca, was married 
to Gov. Joseph Dudley. It is in the possession of Copley 
Amory, a great grandson of the artist, and hangs in the Museum 
of the Fine Arts, Boston. 

OXENBRIDGE THACHER AND HIS WlFE 

The whereabouts of these pictures is at present unknown. 

Sir John Temple 

In crayon. He was a descendant of Leofric, Earl of Mercia, 
husband of the famous Countess Godiva, the founder of the 
great monastery at Coventry, in the time of Edward the Con- 
fessor. Sir John Temple, eighth Baronet, married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Governor Bowdoin, who was born in Boston in 
1767, died in 1798. He was Commissioner of the Royal Navy, 
and, after the war, was Consul General of Great Britain to the 
United States. He is represented in full dress, and a white 
wig. The picture is signed J. S. Copley, and dated 1764. This 
picture was in the possession of a descendant, Winthrop Tappan, 
of Boston. 

Lady Temple 

A crayon. Her maiden name was Elizabeth Bowdoin. She 
is represented in a handsome dress of the period, her neck deco- 
rated with a string of pearls, and her hair drawn back over a 
cushion. This portrait was owned by Winthrop Tappan, of 
of Boston. 



John Singleton Copley 101 

Mrs. Gulian Verplanck 

This is a very handsome portrait of this lady taken with her 
grandchild, Gulian McEvers. She was the mother of Anne 
Verplanck who married Col. Gabriel G. Ludlow, afterwards 
Governor of the Province of New Brunswick. The picture is 
now in the possession of Mrs. P. J. L. Searing, of New York 
City. 

Samuel Verplanck 

This portrait painted about 1770 represents a gentleman 
about forty years of age, and is now owned by his descendant, 
Mr. Samuel Verplanck of Fishkill on the Hudson. 

Hon. Daniel Crommelin Verplanck 

This portrait painted about the same time as that of his 
father, Samuel Verplanck, represents a child about six years of 
age playing with a squirrel. The picture is now owned by Mr. 
W. E. Verplanck, of Fishkill on Hudson. 

Mrs. John Winthrop 

Was a daughter of Mr. Fayerweather, of Cambridge. The 
picture is thirty-six inches by twenty-nine inches; the figure is 
half length, sitting in a high backed chair, covered with red; a 
mahogany table is behind her. The portrait is painted in full 
face; the hair combed back under a white lace cap, trimmed 
with pink and white ribbon. Her dress is of blue silk and is 
ornamented with a bow of blue and white ribbon at the breast, 
the neckerchief and sleeves are of lace, and she wears a pearl 
necklace. In her hand she holds a branch on which are nec- 
tarines and the leaves, both reflected on the top of the table. 



io2 John Singleton Copley 

On her left hand she wears a ring of diamonds and garnets. 
Mrs. Winthrop was the wife of Prof. John Winthrop, Hollis 
Professor of Harvard College. This portrait was painted by 
Copley in 1774, and is a very fine example. It is owned by 
Edward D. Harris, of Yonkers, N. Y., and is in the house, 
No. 8 Holyoke Place, Cambridge. 

Sir John Wentworth 

Was born at Portsmouth, N. H., in 1736; graduated at 
Harvard College in 1755; received the degree of L. L. D. from 
Oxford in 1766; created a Baronet in 1795. He was the last 
Royal Governor of New Hampshire, and died at Halifax in 
1820. The picture is a fine crayon in its original black and 
gold frame. It measures twenty-two inches by eighteen* inches, 
and is signed and dated 1769. He wears a light gray coat and 
waistcoat and a white wig. This picture is now in the possession 
of Mrs. Gordon Abbott. 

A second pastel is in the possession of Mr. Chas. E. Went- 
worth, of Cambridge, and an oil portrait is in the State House 
at Concord, N. H. 

The Western Family 

This picture painted in 1802 is one of the pictures, says Mrs. 
Amory, that may be taken as a fine specimen of Copley's work 
in domestic portraiture. It is now in England. 

Anna Green Winslow 

The daughter of Gen. Joshua Winslow. A very handsome 
miniature of this young lady is owned by Miss E. C. Trott, of 
Niagara Falls. 



John Singleton Copley 103 

Samuel Winthrop 

Was the son of Judge Adam Winthrop who died in 1743. 
The picture measures forty inches by fifty inches. It represents 
Mr. Winthrop as seated by the side of a table, which is covered 
with a red cloth; upon the table is an inkstand and behind it is 
a red curtain. In his right hand he holds a pen and in the left 
there is a scroll. He is dressed in a black robe with linen bands. 
He was a very able lawyer, sometime Clerk of Suffolk County 
Court, and a brother of Prof. John Winthrop. This picture 
is at Harvard College. 

John Singleton Copley 

This portrait by Copley of himself is in the New York His- 
torical Society. He is dressed in red with lace at the neck, face 
turned toward the front and is represented as engaged at his 
easel. He holds a pallette and brushes in his left hand and a 
brush in his right hand. It is a very fine example. 

Gerrish 



This portrait is a late example of Copley's American work. 
It is half size in length and shows him with face slightly turned, 
white wig and white neck cloth. It is owned by a member of 
the family, Major Samuel E. Barrett of Chicago. 

Jarrett Ingersoll 

This is a fine example of Copley's best English portrait work. 
Of a very handsome and dignified man dressed in a rich coat of 
dark salmon-colored velvet with waistcoat embroidered with 
gold braid. He is shown seated holding a document folded, in 
his right hand, with left hand resting on his knee. It is in the 
possession of Mr. Arthur Amory of Boston. 



io4 John Singleton Copley 

Suzanne Randolph 

This superb full length portrait of Miss Randolph was painted 
while she resided with her father who was at the time repre- 
senting the United States in England. It is well known as one 
of the very best examples of Copley's English period. It hung 
for a long time in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and is now 
owned by Mrs. E. D. Brandagee of Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Mrs. Mehitable May Dawes 

The portrait of this lady, who w v as the daughter of Samuel 
May of Boston, measures about twenty-five by thirty inches and 
is not completely finished. She is represented with a large hat 
very high in the crown with a large bow of ribbon on the front 
and ends hanging at the side. A curl hangs over the left shoul- 
der. Dress cut low in the neck and sleeves, lace trimmed reach- 
ing to the elbow. She was born 1751 and died October 28, 
1793. Her husband was William Dawes whom she married in 
1768. They lived prior to the Revolution at 64 Ann Street. 
It is now in the possession of Miss Holland of Concord, Mass. 

Thomas Dongan 

He was a grand nephew of Governor Thomas Dongan, first 
British Governor of New York. The portrait measures forty 
inches by fifty and represents him dressed in plum-colored coat 
with black hat. Landscape background. 

Mrs. Thomas Dongan 

It is a companion picture and shows the lady in a white satin 
dress with blue overdress, seated, holding a black and white 
Spaniel dog. A landscape background. She was Miss Charl- 



John Singleton Copley 105 

ton, of a prominent English family, members of which came to 
New York. This portrait and that of her husband belongs to 
Mr. A. C. E. Hawthorne. 

Mrs. Col. Wm. Paxtell 

This picture is in the De Peyster collection in the New York 
Historical Society. She was the daughter of Abraham De 
Peyster, 1st. The size of the canvas is forty by fifty inches. 
She is dressed in blue silk, white corsage cut low at the neck 
and trimmed with lace. There are three rows of pearls encir- 
cling the neck. She wears short sleeves trimmed with lace and 
a white lace cap. A landscape background showing rays of 
the sun. 

Mrs. John Livingston 

This portrait measuring twenty-five by thirty inches is in the 
New York Historical Society. It is in such bad condition that 
it is difficult to determine whether it is properly attributed to 
Copley. She belonged to the De Peyster family. Her dress 
is of brown silk, white corsage cut low and she wears a white 
lace cap. 

Mrs. Joseph Warren 

This portrait is a three-quarter length seated figure of a hand- 
some woman. It measures forty by fifty inches. She wears a 
light blue dress with pink overdress cut low in the neck. Her 
arm rests on the back of a chair. It is now in the Museum of 
Fine Arts, Boston. 



io6 :;• John Singleton Copley 

General Hyatt 

This portrait of an English General is in Copley's latest man- 
ner. It measures twenty-two by thirty inches and represents 
the subject dressed in the red coat of a British officer. He wears 
no wig but his hair is powdered. A buff waistcoat and his coat 
trimmed with silver lace. His left hand grasps his sword hilt 
which rests on a volume marked Mil Essays. It belongs to 
Mr. T. Jefferson Coolidge, Jr., of Boston. 

The Rev. Samuel Cooper 

There was a crayon likeness of Dr. Cooper in the possession 
of his grandson, Mr. Hixon of New York City, and another 
possibly by Copley, in Memorial Hall, Harvard College. 

Mrs. William Walter 

Was Lydia, daughter of Hon. Benjamin Lynde, of Salem, 
who married Mary, daughter of Hon. John Bowles of Roxbury. 
She was born 1741; married 1766, William Walter, D. D., 
Rector of Trinity Church, of Boston. The portrait, which rep- 
resents her as dressed in a pale blue silk, trimmed with black 
lace, was painted about 1767. She wears a rose in the corsage, 
and her hair is combed back and fastened with pearls and a 
pink ribbon. This picture is owned by Robert Walcott, of 
Cambridge. 

Dr. Sylvester Gardiner 

Son of William Gardiner and Abigail Remington, his wife, 
was born in 171 7. He was educated in Europe as a physician 
and surgeon. A determined loyalist, and an addressor of Gov- 
ernor Hutchinson, he was banished in 1778, at which time 
his landed property, amounting to one hundred thousand acres 



John Singleton Copley 107 

of land, was confiscated. He was the founded of Gardiner, 
Maine, and died at Newport, R. I., in 1786. The picture is of 
life size, three-quarters length, a sitting figure, dressed in a red 
coat, ornamented with gold buttons. His right arm is rest- 
ing on a table, and the left hand is in his coat. This fine por- 
trait is in the possession of his great grandson, R. H. Gardiner, 
of Gardiner, Maine. 

Dr. Fayerweather 

This picture is a miniature painted on copper. It is of half 
length, three inches long by two and a half wide, and is in the 
original silver frame. It represents the doctor in his Oxford 
cap and hood, and wearing a full wig with a black silk robe. Dr. 
Fayerweather was a son of Mr. Fayerwather, of Cambridge. 
He graduated at Harvard College in 1743; was A. M. of Oxford 
in 1756, and Cambridge, England, in 1758. He was ordained 
Deacon by Dr. Pearce, Bishop of Bangor, in 1756, and was ad- 
mitted to full orders by Dr. Richard Osbaldiston, Bishop of 
Carlisle. He w T as licensed to exercise the ministerial function 
by the Bishop of London. On his return to this country, he 
was settled at Kingston, R. I., as the Rector of the Episcopal 
Church there. He married the widow of the Rev. Peter Bours, 
of Marblehead, and died in 1781. In his will, he mentions this 
miniature, and also a large picture of himself, painted by Cop- 
ley, which is now in Rhode Island. The miniature, with the 
certificate of his Oxford degree, is in the possession of his rela- 
tive, Edward D. Harris, of Yonkers, N. Y. 



108 John Singleton Copley 

Josiah Eliot 

A crayon of one-half length. This picture was in the pos- 
session of Miss Hull, of Fairfield, Conn. 

Mrs. Nathaniel Ellery 

She was a daughter of William and Mary (Duncan) Sargent, 
of Gloucester, and a sister of Col. Epes Sargent. She was mar- 
ried February 16, 1721, and died October 8, 1782. The size of 
this picture is four feet one inch by three feet four inches, and 
was taken about 1760, when the lady was seventy years of age. 
She is in a sitting posture, with a watered silk dress, a bodice, 
and an inside lace handkerchief. Her shawl is of black lace, 
thrown over her shoulders; short sleeves with ruffles, complete 
the costume. She is holding an open book in her hand. It is 
now in the possession of N. Martin Rogers, Cambridgeport. 

Dr. De Mountfort 

The size of this picture is twenty-five inches by thirty, and 
represents a child with hair powdered, a blue coat and a yellow 
waistcoat. In the background are rocks and the sea. The boy 
holds in his hand a wreath of flowers. This picture is signed 
J. S. Copley, 1753, and is especially interesting, as it must have 
been painted when the artist was under sixteen years of age. It 
is almost the earliest known specimen of Copley's work, and is 
in Detroit, Michigan. 



John Singleton Copley 109 

The Copley Family 

The original sketch in sepia, from which the family picture 
is painted, is twenty-seven inches long by twenty-one wide. 
Mrs. Copley is represented as seated on a sofa; her arm resting 
on her son, the future Lord Chancellor Lyndhurst, whose arm 
is thrown around her neck. Her daughter Mary leans upon 
her other side, while her daughter Elizabeth stands in front, on 
her right. Mr. Clarke, the father of Mrs. Copley, sits holding 
the infant Jonathan, playing with a rattle upon his lap. This 
child died in 1785. Mr. Copley stands behind, against a column 
of the balcony, and holds in his hands a scroll. In a corner of 
the floor are a child's hat and feathers; and a landscape of trees 
form the background. This picture is now owned by Arthur 
Amory, of Boston. 

Mrs. Copley 

She was Susan, daughter of Richard Clarke, and is repre- 
sented in this picture as wearing a low-necked blue dress. Her 
hair is drawn back over a cushion, and decorated with flowers. 
This picture now belongs to Harcourt Amory, of Boston. 

Mrs. Copley and Her Two Children 

A study in sepia for the family picture. It was in the pos- 
session of John Singleton Copley Greene, Longwood; who had 
also several other studies and beautiful drawings. 

John Singleton Copley 

A miniature, by himself. It is in the possession of the heirs 
of his great grandson, John Singleton Copley Greene, Longwood. 

A second portrait, painted by himself, is a life size head, with 
a powdered wig. He wears a red coat. It was in the possession 



no John Singleton Copley 

of Mrs. G. C. Crowninshield, a great granddaughter of the 
artist. 

There is another, a crayon, twenty-three inches high by seven- 
teen wide. In this he wears a pale green coat, lined with blue, 
a brown embroidered waistcoat, a lace cravat, with his hair 
powdered. It is owned by Harcourt Amory, of Boston. 

A small oval portrait of Copley, painted in England, is owned 
by Mrs. Gordon Dexter, Boston. 

Rev. Samuel Cooper, D. D. 

Born in 1725. Graduated at Harvard College in 1743, and 
was pastor of Brattle Street Church at the age of twenty. He 
was first vice-president of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences. Copley painted several pictures of this distinguished 
divine. One very fine one of half length, with wig and bands, 
is in the possession of Justice Oliver Wendel Holmes. Two 
others were in the possession of the Rev. Dr. Lothrop, pastor 
of Brattle Street Church, the finer one, belonging to the Doctor, 
himself, the other probably a copy. Another portrait is in the 
possession of the Massachusetts Historical Society. 

Judge Metcalf Bowler 
In the possession of Mrs. Wm. C. Snow, Providence, R. I. 

Mrs. Mary Bowers 
A daughter of Joseph Sherburne, of Boston. This picture 
is four feet, six inches in length, by three feet, nine inches in 
width. It was taken at the age of twenty-six years. Her 
dress is of white satin, with a train of purple velvet edged with 
gold. She has a Blenheim spaniel in her lap. It was in the 
possession of her granddaughter, Miss Mary Danforth, of 
Boston. 



John Singleton Copley in 

Mrs. Black 

Of half size. Represents a young lady in a white satin robe. 
This picture was given by Mrs. Black to Mrs. Boardman, and 
by her to her daughter, Mrs. Harrison Gray Otis, in whose pos- 
session it was in 1872. 

Mrs. Benjamin Beale 

Whose maiden name was Ann Copland, was born in Liver- 
pool, May 27, 1745; married there in 1767, and died in Quincy, 
February 13, 1814. 

Also a small portrait of her son, painted at the same time. 
The size is thirteen inches by fifteen. He was born in Liverpool, 
June 6, 1768; died in 1826, in the Bourbonais, Province of 
Normandy, France, where he resided the greater part of his life. 
These portraits were in the possession of their grandchildren , 
the Misses Beale, of Quincy, Mass. 

Benjamin Beale 

He was born in England, May 30, 1741, and died at Quincy, 
Mass., January 29, 1825. He was by profession a sea captain, 
and is represented in a full dress suit of light cloth. The size 
is twenty-nine inches by twenty-four. This portrait was in the 
possession of their grandchildren, the Misses Beale, of Quincy, 
Mass. 

Mrs. Eunice B Alston 

A daughter of John Turner, of Salem. She married first, 
in 1729, Col. Benj. Browne; second, Mr. Balston. The picture 
is five feet long by three feet and a half wide. The portrait 
is in the dress of the period, and is a fine specimen of Copley's 
manner. It belongs to Mr. Edward N. Fenno. 



ii2 John Singleton Copley 

Mrs. Samuel Barrett 

Who was Mary Clarke, a daughter of Richard Clarke. She 
was the sister of Mrs. Copley. The portrait is a small oval, 
five inches and a half by four inches and a half, on copper, and 
represents a pretty young woman in a hat of those times. It is 
in the possession of John Higginson Cabot, of Brookline. 

Judge Samuel Barrett, LL. D. 

The son of John and Sarah Barrett, was born in Boston in 
1738; graduated at Harvard College in 1757. He married first, 
Mary, a daughter of Richard Clarke, and sister to Susan Clarke, 
who married John Singleton Copley. Their brother was Rich- 
ard Clarke, Jr., some time Commissary-general of the British 
Army in Boston. His second wife was Elizabeth Salisbury. He 
was Judge of Probate, and also a Judge of the Supreme Court? 
and received the degree of LL. D. from the University of Edin- 
burgh. Judge Barrett is represented as dressed in a white wig, 
and the costume of the times. The picture is oval, and in 
Copley's later manner, having been painted in London, and is 
now owned by Edward Temple, of Windsor, Vt. 

Major Thos. Goldthwait 

The portrait of this officer is in the possession of Dr. J. T. 
Bowen, of Boston. He served with distinction at several im- 
portant posts. He married as his first wife Esther Sargent, 
daughter of Epes Sargent, and for his second wife, Katherine 
Barnes. 



John Singleton Copley 113 

Major Joseph Goldthwait 

Was born in Boston, October 5, 1730; married Miss Hannah 
Bridgham; and was a brother of Philip Goldthwait. He was a 
major of the British army in Boston, in 1775; was a determined 
loyalist, and an addressor of Governor Hutchinson, and was pro- 
scribed and banished. The picture is twenty-seven inches by 
twenty-two, unfinished; and has been admired by artists on 
account of the vigorous manner in which the subject is treated. 
It is now owned by Miss Adams, of Keene, N. H. 

Ezekiel Goldthwait 

He was at one time Register of Deeds. The picture is of 
life size, and of three-fourths length, representing a gentleman 
dressed in a brown coat, and wearing a white wig, seated at a 
table on which are pens and an ink stand. In his right hand 
he has a pen, while the left holds a deed, the arm resting on the 
back of the chair. Over his head is a curtain. It is owned by 
Dr. J. T. Bowen, of Boston. 

Mrs. Goldthwait 

Wife of Ezekiel Goldthwait. A companion picture to that 
of her husband, representing the lady sitting at a table, on which 
is a dish of fruit. Her right hand rests on the table. Her dress 
is of satin, of the shade called ashes of roses, beautifully painted. 
Her hair is without powder; around her neck are three rows of 
pearls, and a cap completes the costume. It belongs to John W. 
Alline, of Boston. 

Rufus Greene 

The picture is of half-length, and is in Copley's early manner. 
It belonged to William G. Prescott. 



ii4 John Singleton Copley 

Mrs. Rufus Greene 
This picture was in the possession of her great grandson, 
William Gardiner Prescott, and is a companion picture to that 
of her husband. These portraits were formerly full length, but 
being injured by fire, were reduced in size. 

Alice Hooper 
Of Newburyport. This picture is of three-fourths length. 
The figure is rather in profile, and is dressed in a dark blue 
satin. The hair is worn without powder. It is in the possession 
of J. L. Newton. 

Mrs. Daniel Rogers 

She was Elizabeth, daughter of Col. John Gorham; born 
Dec. 10, 1739; married Daniel Rogers, Nov. 6, 1759; died March 
14, 1769. The picture is of three-fourths length, and represents 
the lady in a satin dress, with a hat hanging from her arm. She 
seems to be coming from a garden. It is now owned by Miss 
Louisa Low, of Stamford, Conn. 

Mrs. Samuel Torrey 

She was Miss Catherine Gore, the sister of Governor Gore. 
It is a crayon of half size, taken as a child under or about five 
years old. It was in the possession of Mrs. S. T. Morse, of 
Boston. 

Madam Treadwell 

The picture is of half length, and of life size. The lady is 
dressed in dove colored satin. The sleeves are of half length, 
with broad lawn ruffles. The hair is creped. There is strong 
evidence that this picture was painted by Copley in 1757, and in 
his early manner. It was in the possession of a descendant, 
Miss Hannah Cutter, of Portsmouth, N. H. 



John Singleton Copley 115 

Mrs. Andrew Tyler 

Born 1 73 1, married 1746. Her maiden name was Mary 
Richards; she married the Rev. Andrew Tyler, whose mother 
was a sister of Sir William Pepperell. This picture is a crayon 
of kit-kat size, and represents her as dressed in a blue silk and a 
pink mantle. Her hair is without powder, and circlet of pearls 
close under her chin completes her costume. It is in the posses- 
sion of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, and 
was presented by her grandson, Captain George Jackson of 
Providence. 

William Vans and his Wife 

There were said to have been portraits of the above in the 
possession of a Miss Vans, of Boston. Their whereabouts is 
now unknown. 

The Rev. Wm. Welsteed 

It is probable that the portrait of this gentleman, now in the 
possession of the Massachusetts Historical Society, is the orig- 
inal picture painted by Copley in 1752 or 1753, when he was 
but sixteen years of age, and from which he made his first en- 
graving. 

A duplicate is owned by a church in Waltham, Mass. 

Dr. Whitworth 

A portrait of this gentleman, in crayon, is in the possession of 
a grandson, Mr. J. D. W. White, of Germantown, Penn. 

Tapestry Design 

There is in the possession of Mrs. Green, of Brattleboro, 
Vermont, a tapestry, the design of which was said to have been 
drawn on the canvas by Copley. 



n6 John Singleton Copley 

William Turner and Child 

The former was a son of Peter Turner. This picture is of 
three-quarters length. The father wears a dark dress in the 
fashion of the times, and the boy holds a small dog in his arms. 
In the background are the sea and ships. It is in the possession 
of Mrs. Van Pelt of Philadelphia. 

Thomas Turner 

A son of Peter Turner. This picture is of half length, and 
represents the gentleman as dressed in a brown velvet coat. It 
is owned by Mrs. Van Pelt, of Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Peter Turner and Her Grandson Joseph 

Her maiden name was Sarah Walley. The child is holding a 
rose. The background is a curtain, and beyond a landscape. 
The picture is of three-fourths length, and belongs to Mrs. Van 
Pelt, of Philadalphia. 

Peter Turner and His Son Thomas 

This picture is of three-quarters length, and represents the 
gentleman dressed in the manner of the times, the coat being a 
greenish blue color. The child is dressed in a frock and silk 
skirt. This picture is owned by Mrs. Van Pelt, of Philadelphia. 

The Rev. Mr. Stillman and His Wife 

Who was Judith Bullfinch. These are two oval miniatures. 
In the picture of Mrs. Stillman, the hair is powdered and rolled 
over a cushion, and is ornamented with a pink rose. These 
portraits are in the possession of Miss Julia C. Hixon, of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 



John Singleton Copley 117 

Mrs. W. S. Smith 

Who was the only daughter of John Adams. There is an 
engraving of the portrait of this lady, said to be the one by Cop- 
ley, which was made for Griswold's Republican Court. It was 
painted in 1 786-1 788, and was burned at Fishkill, N. Y. 

Smith 

There is a portrait of Mrs. Smith, which has always been in 
the family, in the possession of Mrs. John Heard, of Ipswich, 
Mass. 

David Sears 

There is a beautiful oval miniature of this gentleman, who 
was an eminent merchant of Boston, and the father of the 
Honorable David Sears. The dress is in the fashion of the 
times, the coat being of plum color. Mr. Sears was a fellow 
passenger of Mrs. Copley and her children in the ship Minerva, 
Captain Callahan, which sailed May 27th, 1775, from Marble- 
head for London, and a tradition in the family is probably cor- 
rect that the portrait was taken in that city. It is in the posses- 
sion of the family. 

John Rogers 

The Protomartyr, of whom there is a portrait in the possession 
of the Massachusetts Historical Society, evidently taken from 
an engraving. It is of half length, and is signed and dated, and 
was presented to the Society by Mr. J. F. Eliot, of Boston. 

Mrs. Marry at 

The mother of the novelist. A portrait of this lady is said to 
be in the possession of the family in England. 



n8 John Singleton Copley 

Thomas Mann 

This picture is three feet high, by two feet eight inches wide. 
The gentleman is represented as standing with his hat under 
his arm. He wears a white wig, and is in the costume of the 
times; both hands are painted. This picture was owned by 
John G. Metcalf, of Mendon, Mass. 

Mrs. Thomas Mann 

A companion picture to that of her husband. The hair is 
combed back, and a long curl hangs upon her shoulder. The 
dress, which is in the fashion of the times, is of a green shade; a 
reddish mantle passes over her left shoulder, and lies upon her 
lap. In her hands, which are both painted, she holds a string 
of beads. It is said that the two portraits were painted as early 
as 1753. It * s m tne possession of John G. Metcalf, of Mendon, 
Mass. 

Captain Lyde 

Who at one time commanded the ship Galen, was said to have 
been painted by Copley, and the portrait was in the possession 
of Miss Maria Lyde, his daughter, in 1866. 

Mrs. Judge Livermore 

Was a daughter of the Rev. Arthur Browne, of Portsmouth, 
N. H. This portrait is owned by James H. Ford, of New York. 

Joseph Sayer Hixon 

This is a miniature of a handsome man of about twenty-eight 
years of age, with powdered hair, a scarlet coat, and plaited 
ruffles. It is in the possession of a great granddaughter, Miss 
Julia P. Hixon, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 



John Singleton Copley 119 

Mrs. Joseph Sayer Hixon 

Was Abigail, daughter of the Rev. Samuel Cooper. Her 
portrait, which is a pendant to that of her husband, represents 
her with powdered hair, which is surmounted with a gauze toque. 
The dress is cut low in the neck, which is decorated with a hand- 
some pearl necklace; over her shoulders is a mantle of blue satin, 
trimmed with ermine. It belongs to Miss Julia P. Hixon, of 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hill 

Whose portraits in oil were taken by Copley, were the grand- 
father and grandmother of Edward Everett. The pictures are 
now in the possession of a great grandson, Sidney Everett, of 
Boston. 

Mrs. Samuel Greenwood 

Mother of John Greenwood, the artist, was Mary Charnock. 
Her portrait by Copley is now in the possession of her great 
grandson, John Danforth Greenwood, of Motucka Nelson, New 
Zealand. A sketch of this picture is owned by Isaac J. Green- 
wood, of New York City. 

Governor Franklin 

Of Vermont. There is a portrait of this gentleman, by 
Copley, says Mr. Thomas H. White, of Shelburne, in the pos- 
session of the widow of the late Rev. Fitzgerald Uniac, who 
has possibly another one. 



120 John Singleton Copley 

Thomas Fleet 
This picture is of full length, in an oval painted panel, and the 
subject was a son of Thomas Fleet and Elizabeth Goose, his 
wife, the celebrated Mother Goose of our childhood. He was 
born in 1732, and died in 1797. The portrait has always been 
in the family, and it is known that Copley and Fleet were on in- 
timate terms from boyhood. The picture was in the possession 
of a descendant, John F. Eliot, of Boston. 

James Erving 
Was the fourth son of the Honorable John Erving. This 
portrait is a miniature of oval form, and there is a tradition in 
the family that "it was the first miniature in oil that Copley 
made." It is owned by J. Langdon Erving, of New York. 

Hon. John Erving 
This gentleman was a distinguished citizen of Boston, the 
father of Mrs. Governor Bowdoin. This fine picture, for which 
Mr. Copley was paid one hundred pounds, is in the possession 
of J. Langdon Erving, of New York, and was shown in the 
Hudson Fulton Exhibition in that city. 

Lady Erskine 
There was a portrait of this lady, said to be by Copley, in the 
possession of Ignatius Sargent, of Brookline, Mass. 

Judge Duane 
In the Documentary History of New York, Vol. IV., page 
654, it is stated that there was a portrait of this gentleman, 
painted by Copley. It is said now to be in the possession of 
a great granddaughter, Mrs. D. C. Western, of Madison, New 
Jersey. 



John Singleton Copley 121 

Judge Thomas Dawes 

This portrait, which has always been in the family, says his 
grandson, the Rev. Thomas Dawes, of Brewster, Mass., rep- 
resents him as a boy dressed in the fashion of the times, with his 
hat under his arm and an orange in his hand. The picture is 
about four feet long by three feet wide. Judge Dawes was born 
in 1757, and was a graduate of Harvard College, 1777. He 
married Margaret, daughter of William and granddaughter of 
the Rev. Daniel Greenleaf. He was a Judge of the Supreme 
Court of Massachusetts from 1792 to 1802, when he resigned. 
He was afterwards appointed Judge of Probate for Suffolk,, 
and held that office until 1822. He died in 1825. It is the 
property of the Rev. Mr. Dawes, and is in the possession of his 
sister, Mrs. Minot. 

John Codman 

There is a fine portrait of this genleman, painted in England, 
and in Copley's latest manner, in the Massachusetts Historical 
Society. 

Hon. John Burguyn 

Emigrated to America in the last century, and brought with 
him a considerable fortune. His residence was Wilmington 
North Carolina, where he owned a very large landed estate, and 
from whence he carried on an extensive commercial business, 
having agents in London, Bristol, Hamburg, and Amsterdam. 
He was president of the King's Council for the State of North 
Carolina, a man of great influence and of high character. His 
portrait was taken in England in 1783, and is signed in full by 
the artist. In his diary he mentions that he paid his friend 
Copley eighty-three guineas for it. The portrait is of half length. 



122 John Singleton Copley 

Mr. Burguyn is represented as standing, holding in one hand a 
book and in the other a pen; the coat is of dark drab color, and 
on the head is a white wig. This picture is in the possession of 
a grandson, Colonel Henry R. Burguyn, of Richmond, Virginia. 

Mrs. Sylvanus Bourne 

Whose maiden name was Mercy Gorham. It is stated in 
Freeman's History of Cape Cod, Vol. II., page 301, that a por- 
trait of this lady was painted by Copley. When last heard of, 
it was in the possession of Colonel Samuel Swett of Boston. 
Its whereabouts is now unknown. 

Belcher 

There are said to be portraits of the Belchers in the possession 
of the Jennison family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Atkinson 

There are said to be portraits of this gentleman and lady in 
the possession of Mr. Louis Popham, Scarsdale, Westchester 
County, New York. 

Dr. Isaac Foster, Jr. 

A son of Captain Isaac Foster, represented as a youth of about 
fifteen years old, and a companion picture to that of his brother. 
It is owned by Mrs. Philip Peck, of Walpole, N. H. 

Captain Isaac Foster 

Of Charlestown, representing him standing, the picture being 
three-fourths length. He is dressed in a slate-colored costume 
of the times, and carries his hat under his arm. This portrait 
is in the possession of Mrs. David Buffum, of Walpole, N. H. 



John Singleton Copley 123 

Dr. William Foster 

A son of Captain Isaac Foster. A portrait of three-fourths 
length, now belonging to a descendant. Mrs. Philip Peck, of 
Walpole. X. H. 

Mrs. Isaac Foster 

A companion picture to that of her husband. This portrait 
is owned by a descendant. Mrs. David BufTum, of Walpole, 
N. H. 

Mrs. Axstice Davis 

Was a daughter of Sheriff Stephen Greenleaf. and a sister of 
Airs. John Apthorp. This portrait represents her as a young 
and beautiful woman. It is excellent both as respects drawing 
and coloring, and is now in possession of a relative. Miss E. C. 
BuLhnch. 

Prof. John Wixthrop. LL. D.. F. R. S. 

He was the son of Judge Adam Winthrop; was born in Bos- 
ton in 1 714, graduated at Harvard in 1732, and died at Cam- 
bridge in 1779. He was Hollis Professor of Mathematics and 
Natural Philosophy in Harvard College for more than forty 
years. He was distinguished as a mathematician and an as- 
tronomer, and was a prolific writer on both subjects. The 
picture is four feet one inch long by three feet three inches wide. 
He is seated at a table, holding an astronomical diagram. On 
the table is a study telescope and a heavy volume without a title. 
He is dressed in a black robe, with linen bands. The thoughtful 
expression of countenance is exceedingly well rendered. It is 
in the possession of Harvard College. 



124 John Singleton Copley 

Joshua Winslow 

Paymaster and Commissary General of the forces sent to 
Acadia, under Gen. John Winslow, was a son of Sheriff Edward 
Winslow, and descended from John, brother of Edward Winslow, 
the Governor of Massachusetts. This portrait represents him 
as wearing the undress uniform of a British officer, and is signed 
and dated 1755. 

Hon. Richard Wibird 

Of the King's Colonial Council for New Hampshire, one of 
the seven proprietors of that colony. He was a Judge of Pro- 
bate, etc. The picture measures three feet one inch in length 
by two feet six inches in width, and represents a handsome man 
dressed in a brown velvet coat and waistcoat; there are fine lace 
ruffles over the hands, which are very delicate. He wears a 
light-colored wig, which completes his costume. This picture 
is owned by Mr. Penhallow, of Boston. 

Mrs. Oliver Whipple 

Was Abigail, youngest daughter of Dr. Sylvester Gardiner, 
born in 1750, and a sister of the Hon. Mrs. Arthur Browne, of 
Mrs. Robert Hallowell, and Mrs. Philip Dumaresq. The size of 
the picture is three-fourths length, and the lady is represented 
as seated in the open air, dressed in a white satin robe with a 
blue silk mantle. She has a blue silk collar around her neck; 
her hair is without powder, and ornamented with small flowers; 
in the background on her right there is a large tree. This 
picture belongs to Mrs. Jas. M. Codman, of Brookline. 



John Singleton Copley 125 

Catharine Whipple 

Was the wife of William Whipple, of Portsmouth, N. H., one 
of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. She was the 
daughter of John Moffat, a descendant of John Mason, the 
Grantee of New Hampshire. The figure is of two-thirds length, 
and nearly life size. She is painted as sitting under a tree, with 
a basket of roses in her left hand, and a single red rose in her 
right. Her costume is a heavy yellowish brocade. The tradi- 
tion is that the portrait was painted when she was very young. 
It now belongs to The Misses Peabody, of Cambridge. 

Lady Frances Deering Wentworth 

Was a daughter of Samuel Wentworth, of Boston. She was 
born in 1746, and died in England in 1813; she was first the wife 
of her cousin, Theodore Atkinson. She afterwards married 
another cousin, Sir John Wentworth. The picture, taken at 
the age of nineteen, is of three-fourths length, and measures 
forty by fifty-one inches; her dress is of white satin, with pearls 
around the neck and in her hair. In her left hand she holds a 
chain, to which is attached a flying squirrel which plays upon a 
table. The picture is signed John S. Copley, 1765, and is in 
the possession of the Lenox Library, New York. 

Mary Watts 

A daughter of Sarah Osborne, whose second husband was 
Judge Samuel Watts. She married Dr. Edward Watts, a son 
of her stepfather. The picture is half length, twenty-nine inches 
long by twenty-four wide. The dress is of green satin, a bow at 
the waist, and a pink scarf. The hair is without powder, sur- 



126 John Singleton Copley 

mounted by small white flowers. The ornaments are pearl ear- 
rings and a pearl necklace. It belongs to Mr. F. S. Moseley, of 
Boston. 

Mrs. Samuel Watts 

Her maiden name was Sarah Osborne, a sister of Mrs. Epes 
Sargent, Jr. She married, first, Thomas Oxnard, who died in 
1754; and second, in 1756, Judge Samuel Watts. Her portrait, 
is beautifully painted, represents her as a very fine looking 
woman, dressed in black, with a widow's cap. The size of the 
picture is twenty-nine inches long by twenty-four inches wide. 
It is owned by Mrs. T. J. Lee, of Boston. 

Elkanah Watson 

Son of Elkanah, and a half brother of Col. George Watson, 
was a descendant of Robert, of Plymouth, 1623. He was born 
in 1758, and died 1842. He was one of the most distinguished 
men of his time, and also one of the most active among those 
opposed to the English power. A friend of Franklin, Burke, 
Priestley, and Watt. The picture represents him standing, and 
leaning against a pillar. In his right hand he holds a cane and 
a letter, and in his left a hat; a table stands near, over which is 
seen the sea with a ship bearing a flag. "The painting was 
finished," says Mr. Watson in his journal, "in most admirable 
style, except the background, which Copley and I designed to 
represent a ship bearing to America the acknowledgment of 
our independence, with the sun rising upon the stripes of the 
Union, streaming from her gaff. All was complete save the 
flag, which Copley did not deem it proper to hoist under present 
circumstances, as his gallery was a constant resort for the royal 
family and the nobility. I dined with the artist on the glorious 



John Singleton Copley 127 

fifth of December, 1782. After listening with him to the 
speech of the king, formally recognizing the United States of 
America as in the rank of nations, previous to dinner, and im- 
mediately after our return from the House of Lords, he invited 
me into the studio, and there, with a bold hand, a master's touch, 
and, I believe, an American heart, attached to the ship the Stars 
and Stripes; this was, I imagine, the first American flag hoisted 
in Old England." It is stated, in the life of Mr. Watson, that 
he paid one hundred guineas for this picture. It was in the 
possession of Mrs. Thompson, of Philadelphia. 

Mrs. George Watsox 

Daughter of Chief Justice Oliver, was born in 1735; and died 
in 1767, aged thirty-two. She is represented as dressed in rose- 
colored satin. The figure is somewhat in profile. The hair is 
without powder; the right hand holds a scarf, which is partially 
draped around the waist; in her left hand she bears a beautiful 
little vase. The whole picture is very well painted, and graceful. 
It belonged to Mr. Martin Brimmer. 

Col. George Watson 

Son of John Watson, married first Abigail Saltonstall; second, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Chief Justice Peter Oliver. "He was an 
opulent and liberal merchant of Plymouth," says Thacher. 
The picture is of three-fourths length, and is in profile, repre- 
senting Colonel W T atson standing, with one hand resting on a 
table, the other holding a letter which he seems to read. He is 
dressed in a handsome brown suit, laced with gold. It is a very 
fine picture. Colonel Watson was born in 1718, and died in 
1800. This picture now hangs in Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth, Mass. 



128 John Singleton Copley 

Watson and the Shark 

Representing the harbor of Havana, and Brook Watson, after- 
wards Lord Mayor of London, attacked by a shark; the picture 
is taken at the moment of his rescue by a boat's crew. This 
picture, which is a duplicate of one painted for Brook Watson, 
was painted in 1778, and was engraved by Valentine Green in 
1779. This picture is in the Boston Museum of the Fine Arts, 
and the original sketch is owned by Mrs. Gordon Dexter, of 
Boston. 

Mary Warner 

Was a daughter of the Hon. Jonathan Warner, who was born 
in 1726, and appointed member of the King's Council in 1766. 
He married for his first wife, Mary, daughter of Temple Nelson, 
Esq. They had one daughter, Mary, who married Col. Samuel 
Sherburne, and was the subject of this picture. She is repre- 
sented as a young lady about sixteen years of age, with a dress 
of yellowish brown satin, and standing with a bird resting on 
her left hand, while her right hand holds the ribbon which de- 
tains her pet. This picture is owned by Miss E. Sherburne, of 
Portsmouth, N. H. 

Mrs. Jonathan Warner 

This picture is fifty inches long by thirty-nine wide. She was 
the daughter of Archibald Macphreadris, and the second wife 
of Hon. Jonathan Warner. She is represented as sitting, with a 
very beautiful garland of flowers in her lap. Her dress is a 
light brown satin. This portrait still hangs in her father's old 
house at Portsmouth, N. H., and is owned by Miss E. Sherburne. 



John Singleton Copley 129 

Daniel Wait 

This picture is two feet and a half long, and two feet wide. 
It is in the original frame, and represents a boy in a standing 
position. The dress is a cloth coat of the color of ashes of roses. 
The waistcoat is blue, and under his left arm he carries his hat. 
In the right hand, which is unfinished, he holds fruit, and his 
hair is without powder. The tradition is that Mr. Copley sailed 
for Europe before he could complete this picture, which, there- 
fore, must have been painted in 1 774. It has always been owned 
by the family, and is now in the possession of John S. Williams, 
of Boston. 

Gen. George Washington 

A miniature painted in 177 1. It was in the possession of Mr. 
G. P. Putnam, of New York. 

Winslow Warren 

Was a son of General James and Mercy Warren. The picture 
is of life size. The countenance is florid, with dark eyes and 
eyebrows. The coat is of light brown, with a dark velvet collar; 
a white neckcloth, ruffles, and powdered hair, complete the 
picture, which was painted in London toward the close of the 
Revolution. It is owned by Winslow Warren, of Dedham. 

Mrs. Mercy Otis Warren 

Wife of Gen. James Warren, was a sister of the patriot, James 
Otis. "She had," says Drake, "an active as well as a powerful 
mind. She wrote several satirical, poetical, and dramatic pieces, 
among them a satire in the form of a drama, called 'The Group,' 
and another called 'The Adulator,' which were famous at the 



130 John Singleton Copley 

time. Her poems, full of patriotic feeling, were published in 
1790, while in 1805, she published her great work, l The History 
of the Revolutionary War.'" The figure is of life size, and of 
three-fourths length, and represents the lady as standing, train- 
ing a nasturtium vine with her right hand, while the left is raised 
and stretched forward. The face is delicate and intellectual. 
The eyes and hair are dark, and her headdress is of white lace, 
trimmed with white satin ribbons. Her robe is dark green 
satin, with a pompadour waist, trimmed with point lace. There 
is a full plait at the back hanging from the shoulders, and her 
sleeves are also of point lace. White illusion trimmed with 
point lace, and fastened with white satin bow, covers her neck. 
The front of the skirt and of the sleeves are elaborately trimmed 
with puffings of satin. It is now owned by Winslow Warren, of 
Dedham. 

Gen. James Warren 

A descendant of Richard, who settled at Plymouth in 1620, 
and was born in 1726. Graduated at Harvard in 1745, and 
died in 1808. He married Mercy Otis. He was a man of large 
fortune, and a distinguished patriot; a member of the General 
Court in 1776; was High Sheriff of the County, and President of 
the Provincial Congress after the death of Gen. Joseph Warren. 
He was a Major General of Militia. The picture is of three- 
fourths length, and of life size, and represents the General stand- 
ing, with his left hand grasping his cane, while the right is con- 
cealed by the lappel of his long waistcoat. His dress is a drab 
cloth coat and black waistcoat, ruffles, and a gray wig. It now 
belongs to Winslow Warren, of Dedham. 



John Singleton Copley 131 

Gen. Joseph Warren 
Born June n, 1741; killed at the battle of Bunker Hill, June 
17, 1775. A full length figure. He is represented in costume. 
The canvas is about five feet long by four feet wide, and the 
coloring is very beautiful. It was one of Copley's last portraits 
before he left Boston for Europe in 1774, and as a piece of ar- 
tistic skill, as well as for its historic interest, has been pronounced 
to be one of the most valuable of Copley's portraits in this 
country. "It was painted while General Warren was the pre- 
siding officer of the Massachusetts Congress." It was be- 
queathed to the Boston Museum of the Fine Arts by Dr. Buck- 
minster Brown. 

Gen. Joseph Warren 

Another portrait, twenty-nine inches long by twenty-four 
inches wide, represents him as seated at a table in citizen's dress, 
showing one hand only. This picture was originally owned 
by Gen. Arnold Welles, who married Gen. Warren's daughter. 
It passed from him to Dr. J. C. W T arren, and from him to his 
grandson, the present Dr. John Collins Warren, of Boston. 

Mrs. Col. Samuel Waldo 

Was Griselda, daughter of Lieut. Governor Andrew Oliver. 
She was born in 1737, married in 1760, and died in 1761. A 
life-sized head. The upper part of her dress, which is seen, is a 
blue-flowered silk. Her hair and eyes are dark. The left side 
of the hair is dressed with pearls and a small spray of flowers. 
She wears pearl earrings, and around her throat is a lace tie. 

There is a companion picture to this, representing a sister of 
Mrs. Waldo, in the possession of Mrs. Ellis, of Burlington, New 
Jersey. 



132 John Singleton Copley 

Mrs. Eliza Vose 
Daughter of Captain Tufts of the Royal Navy. This picture 
is a crayon, representing a young lady, on whose head is a blue 
veil, her right hand holding to her breast a string of pearls and 
a bow. It is in the possession of a descendant, Mrs. Elijah 
Vose, of Boston. 

Mrs. Judge Vinal 

Whose maiden name was Osborn. This picture represents a 
young lady standing in a garden, the background being a wall, 
with a hill and water in the distance. It is of three-fourths 
length. The dress is of mauve pink satin, cut square in the 
neck, and ornamented with rich lace. The hair and eyes are 
dark. It is owned by Fred'k Amory, of Boston. 

Captain William Turner 

He was a lineal descendant of the fifth generation from Hum- 
phrey Turner, who came from Essex in England to Plymouth, 
Mass., in 1628. He was born in 1745, and married in 1767, 
Ann, the daughter of Edward Dumaresq and Mary Bautineaux, 
his wife. In June, 1787, he was appointed by John Hancock 
an aide-de-camp to the Governor, and this commission, with 
John Hancock's signature and that of John Avery, his secretary, 
is in the possession of Samuel Epes Turner. This picture is a 
crayon, twenty-three inches long by seventeen wide. It is of 
life size, and nearly half length. He is dressed in a coat and 
waistcoat of white cassimere, and wears a ruffled shirt, fastened 
in front by a pin, and his right hand is thrust into his bosom. 
His hair is powdered, and dressed in a queue. This picture is 
in the possession of a grandson, Samuel F. Turner, of Baltimore, 
Md. 



John Singleton Copley 133 

Mrs. William Turner 

Was a daughter of Edward and Mary Dumaresq, and a great- 
granddaughter of Hellier Dumaresq, Seigneur des Augres, and 
Jurat of the Royal Council of the Isle of Jersey. She was bap- 
tized at King's Chapel in Boston, in 1746, and was married at 
the same place in 1767, and died in 1824. It is a companion 
picture to that of her husband, and is signed and dated 1767. 
Her dress is a low-necked corsage of white satin. Over her 
shoulders is an ermine tippet. The throat is tightly clasped by 
a broad necklace, containing three rows of pearls. Her hair is 
rolled back over cushions, and ornamented by a small blue silk 
cap, fastened by four pearl-headed pins. This picture is owned 
by a grandson, Samuel F. Turner, of Baltimore, Md. 

Mary Turner 

Who married Daniel Sargent. This picture is of three- 
fourths length. She is dressed in a rich satin, handsomely 
trimmed and decorated with lace. In her right hand she holds 
a dish to a fountain, while with her left she draws back her skirt. 
Her hair is without powder, and around her throat is a lace ruche. 
This beautiful picture is signed John Singleton Copley, and 
dated 1769. It is owned by Mrs. Bowman H. McCalla, nee 
Sargent, of Santa Barbara, Cal. 

Hon. Thomas Cranston 

He was grandson of Governor Saul Cranston of Rhode 
Island, and served in the General Assembly of Rhode Island 
before the Revolution. The picture is three-quarters length, 
the figure standing with right hand resting on his hip and 
left on the back of a chair. White waist coat. It is owned 
by W. U. Hidden of Providence, R. I. 



134 John Singleton Copley 

Mrs. Thomas Cranston 

The portrait of this handsome woman, who was Mary Cogge- 
shall, is one of Copley's best. It possesses all the charm of 
grace and delicacy characteristic of his finest examples. She 
is dressed in a violet color silk. Lace kerchief over the shoul- 
ders. Sleeves laced trimmed and lace cap. Two white satin 
bows on the front of her corsage, a double row of pearls en- 
circles her neck. It is three-quarters length and lifesize, and 
belongs to Mr. D. Berkeley Updike of Boston. 

Miss Rhoda Cranston 

A portrait of a beautifully dressed lady of three-quarters 
length. Her robe is of pink silk and she holds a spray of flowers. 
The picture has a landscape background. It is owned by 
Mr. D. Berkeley Updike of Boston. Miss Cranston became 
the wife of Rev. Luke Babcock. 

Hannah Loring 

Married a Mr. Winslow. This three-quarter length stand- 
ing figure of a handsome woman is in Copley's latest American 
style. It measures forty inches by fifty inches. She is dressed 
in a changeable blue silk, cut low in the neck, with elbow sleeves. 
Both corsage and sleeves are lace trimmed and she wears white 
gloves reaching to the elbow. A bow of blue decorates the 
centre of the corsage and also fastens the hair in the back. She 
wears her hair brushed back from the forehead and is engaged 
in picking roses. Her right hand rests at her waist, a lace 
trimmed hat hanging from her arm. It is in the possession of 
Justice William Caleb Loring of Boston. 



John Singleton Copley 135 

Pictures in England 

The author is unable to give a list of the many pictures in 
England, but mention is made of a few known to exist, not 
described elsewhere : — 

The Tribute Money. 

Portrait of Admiral Barrington owned by Viscount Bar- 
rington. 

Lord Besborough. 

Viscount Cornwallis owned by the City of London. 

Lord Weston and Brother. 

The Battle of La Hague. 

Viscount Dudley. 

The Nativity. 

The Resurrestion, Copley's last picture, made in 181 1. 

Lord Lyndhurst Sale 

A few of Copley's pictures not otherwise described, are 
listed below as having been sold by the executors of Lord Lynd- 
hurst in March, 1864: — 

Portrait of Lord Howe, small circle, engrayed. 

Portrait of Admiral Viscount Duncan, afterwards Lord Cam- 
perdown, engraved. Exhibited at the Royal Academy in the 
year 1798. 

Another portrait of Admiral Duncan, rolled. 

Head of an Officer, rolled. 

Portrait of a Lady, signed and dated Boston, 1772. 

A Youth rescued from a Shark. Engraved by Valentine 
Green. 

The Nativity. Engraved. 



136 John Singleton Copley 

Monmouth before James II., refusing to give the names of 
his accomplices. 

Head of a favorite Negro. Very fine: introduced into the 
picture of " A Boy saved from a Shark." 

Portrait of Mr. Bransden. 

Abraham's Sacrifice; exhibited at the Royal Academy, 1796. 
Engraved by Dunkerton. 

Hagar and Ishmael in the Wilderness; the companion ex- 
hibited at the Royal Academy in 1798. 

The Virgin and Child, St. Catherine, and an Angel: a beau- 
tiful study for a portion of the preceeding picture, painted at 
Parma about 1774 or 1775. 

Unknown Portrait 

There is owned by Mr. Nesmith of Lowell, a very distin- 
guished and handsome portrait of a lady by Copley, the subject 
of which is unknown. She is represented as standing, with a 
table at her left, on which is a vase of tulips, one of which she 
is taking with her right hand. She is dressed in brown, and 
her sleeves have wide lace ruffles on them. 

Unknown 

A boy wearing a hat decorated with feathers, and holding a 
dog. This picture was in the possession of a branch of the 
White family, of Boston. 

Two miniatures, said to be by Copley, were in the possession 
of Miss Sarah Hooper, of Boston. 

A portrait of a lady, dressed in white satin, of three-fourths 
length, owned by Mrs. A. S. Porter, has always been in the 
family, and is believed to be by Copley. 



John Singleton Copley 137 

Mr. Roland Ellis, of Boston, has a picture forty inches long 
by thirty-six inches wide, representing two children, one stand- 
ing, and holding fruit, the other seated. There is a small spaniel 
on the floor between them. The tradition is that it was painted 
by Copley, and it has many of the characteristics of some of his 
earliest works, especially in the coloring, the dog, the fruit, and 
the jewels on the boy's dress. The picture came from the 
Clarke mansion, afterwards the residence of Sir Henry Frank- 
land, and by his executors sold to the father of Mr. Ellis. There 
is some evidence to show that these children might have been 
grandchildren of Mr. Clarke, and were named Greenough. It 
is quite possible that Copley painted the picture. 

A small miniature of a gentleman, presented to the present 
owner by Gambadelia, the painter. He is dressed in a blue 
coat, and his hair is without powder. It is beautifully executed, 
and in the possession of Mrs. R. M. Staigg. 

A Girl and Dog. This picture is owned by J. A. Hewlett, 
New York. 

An oval portrait of a lady, subject unknown, with a rose in 
her hair, is owned by Mrs. Gordon Dexter. 

Notes 

The portrait of a British officer, purporting to be of Major 
Andre, and attributed to Copley, hanging in the Corcoran Gal- 
lery at Washington is now believed not to be of Major Andre, 
and not by Copley. 

Hanging in the Ann Mary Brown Memorial at Providence, 
is a portrait at one time attributed to Copley, as of the Earl of 



138 John Singleton Copley 

Chatham. It is now known to be of William Pitt, second son 
of the Earl of Chatham. Artist unknown. It is, however, a 
very handsome portrait. 

The portrait of Thos. Hollis, professor of Divinity, now at 
Harvard College, and listed as by Copley, is impossible, as Pro- 
fessor Hollis died in 173 1 before the birth of Copley. 

The portrait of a Mrs. Morton, reported as by Copley, through 
misinformation to Mr. Perkins, is by Gilbert Stuart. 

The portrait formerly listed of Mrs. Ellery, is known to be 
that of Mrs. Daniel Rogers. 

The portrait of Charles Apthorp, attributed to Copley's brush 
by Mr. Perkins, is now known to be by Robert Feke. 

The portrait of Mrs. Barrell, daughter of Mr. Saward, called 
a Copley, is signed and dated J. Blackburn, 1761. It is owned 
by Dr. Leonard Wheeler, of Worcester, Mass. 

The portrait of Mrs. Sylvester Gardiner, owned by Mr. Robt. 
H. Gardiner of Gardiner, Me., is believed by him to be a copy 
after Copley and not an original. 

The portraits of Col. James Otis and of Mrs. Otis, attributed 
to Copley, are now known to be by Blackburn. 

The portrait of Lady Peppereli and her sister, Miss Royal on 
one canvas, are, the author believes, the work of Blackburn- 
Listed as Copley's. 

There are known to be several copies made by Copley from 
the old masters, now in this country. 



Supplement 



The following additions to the list of Copley's pictures were 
overlooked in the first compilation. 

Admiral Rainier 

This is an English portrait representing the subject as wearing 
heavy glasses. He is dressed in the uniform of a British Naval 
Officer. The picture is attributed to Copley and hangs in the 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 

Eleanor Foster 

Afterwards Mrs. Nathaniel Coffin of Portland, Maine. It is 
dated 1755. If by Copley it is of course one of the very early ones. 
It is owned by Mrs. G. S. Curtis, of Boston. 

Dr. Mather Byles 

This portrait of Dr. Byles is an early and poor example of Copley's 
work. The size is twenty by twenty-four inches, and it is in the 
original black frame. Dr. Byles graduated from Harvard College 
in 1725, and was pastor of the Hollis Street Church. It was sold 
by C. F. Libbie & Co., to the present owner, Mr. F. L. Gay, of 
Brookline. 

Mather Byles 

A companion picture to that of his father. The junior Mather 
Byles graduated from Harvard College in 175 1, and for fifteen years 
was minister of a church in New London; he went to England and 
took orders in the Church of England, and on his return here was 



chosen rector of Christ Church, Boston. In 1776, when the British 
troops evacuated Boston, he went to Halifax and was made chap- 
lain to the garrison. He was later the rector of a church in St. John, 
N. B., where he died in 1 814 at the age of eighty. 

Madam Cotton 

Madam Cotton was a resident of Sandwich, Mass. There was a 
portrait of her husband, but its whereabouts are unknown. She 
wears a greenish blue silk dress, loose sleeves, neck cut square, and 
a rosette on her head. She is seated in a chair with fan in her hand, 
and there is a column at the left of the picture. The size is forty 
by fifty inches, and is owned by Mrs. H. J. Hayden, of New York. 

Lord North and Lady North 

It is said that they had the unenviable reputation of being the 
ugliest couple in England. 

George III. and His Queen 

Painted for Governor Wentworth of Portsmouth, still in the old 
Wentworth House at Portsmouth, N. H. 

"The Three Princesses" 

Exhibited in the Royal Academy in 1785, represents the three 
children of George III., and now hangs in Buckingham Palace, 
London. The scene is a garden, the flag of England on a tower of 
Windsor Castle, showing in the background. There are flowers 
and parrots. The youngest girl is sitting in a garden carriage, 
holding Sophia by the hand, while Mary, the eldest, is holding aloft 
a tambourine for the amusement of little Amelia, who with bare 
feet, forms the central figure. 



"Sir Edward Knatchbull's Family" 

There are twelve in the group. The picture covered one end 
of the great room in the Baronet's house. This beautiful painting 
was little known owing to the unwillingness of the family to exhibit 
it, or to have it engraved. 

Pepperell Family 

Copley painted a picture of the Pepperell family, the baronet, 
his wife, son, and three daughters. It is at Wanlip Hall, Leicester, 
England. 

Captain John Evans 

There is a portrait of this gentleman in the National Museum, at 
Washington, D. C. 

Mary Smith Austen 

A portrait of this lady by Copley is said to belong to Mr. Edward 
Kent, of Chestnut Hill. 

Unknown 

A portrait of a lady by Copley is said to be in the possession of 
the Blair family in Washington, D. C. 

Unknown 

There is a portrait measuring forty by fifty inches, of a lady 
dressed in brown, with elbow sleeves, in the possession of Mrs. 
Andrew C. Wheelwright. 



Index 



PAGE 

~ - Adams, John 9 

Adams, John 9 

Adams, Mrs. John 9 

P\ - Adams, John Quincy 10 

• - Adams, Samuel 10 

H ■ Allen, Nathaniel n 

H ' Allen, Mrs. Nathaniel n 

Allen, James 11 

Amory, Thomas 12 

Amory, Mrs. Thomas 12 

Amory, John, Senior 12 

Amory, Mrs. John 13 

Amory, Thomas 13 

Appleton, Rev. Nathaniel 10 

Appleton, Mrs. Nathaniel ... 11 

Apthorp, Rev. East 13 

Apthorp, Captain 13 

Apthorp, Mrs. John 14 

Andrews, John 14 

Ascension of Christ 14 

Atkinson, Mr. and Mrs 122 

Abraham's Sacrifice 136 

Babcock, Adam 23 

Babcock, Mrs. Adam 23 

Bacon, Mrs. John 17 

Bacon, Mrs 17 

Barrel!, Joseph 17 

Barrell, Mrs. Anna Pierce.. 19, 19 

Barrell, Mrs. Hannah Fitch . . 19 

Barrett, John 17 

Barrett, Mrs. John 18 

Barnard, Rev. Edward 24 

Battle of the Pyrenees 24 

-■ Boylston, Thomas 16 

f* Boylston, Mrs. Thomas 16 

H Boylston, Nicholas 21 

Bours, John 23 

Brattle, Gen. William 15 

Brown, Rev. Arthur 15 

Brown, Mrs. Arthur 16 

Brown, The Hon. Mrs. Arthur 16 



PAGE 

Brown, Capt. Stephen 20 

Brown, Mrs. Mary Barron . . 21 

Bowler, Mrs. Judge 22 

Bowdoin, James 22 

Burr, Col. Thaddeus 14 

Burr, Mrs. Thaddeus 15 

Bowler, Judge Metcalf no 

Balston, Mrs. Eunice in 

Beale, Benjamin in 

Beale, Mrs. Benjamin in 

Black, Mrs in 

Barrett, Mrs. Samuel 112 

Barrett, Judge Samuel 112 

Bowers, Mrs. Mary no 

Burguyn, Hon. John 121 

Bourne, Mrs. Sylvanus 122 

Belcher 122 

Barrington, Admiral 135 

Besborough, Lord 135 

Bransden, Mr 136 

Clark, Mrs. Miriam (Kilby) . . 25 

Clarke, William 24 

Clarke, Dr. John 24 

Clarke, Mrs. John 25 

Clarke, Richard 25 

Chardon, Peter 26 

Calif, Mrs. Joseph 26 

Catten, Miss 26 

Gary, Samuel 26 

Gary, Mrs. Samuel 26 

Gary, Rev. Thomas 27 

Coffin, Mrs 27 

Cooper, My les, D. D 27 

Cornwallis, Lord 27, 135 

Coffin, Thomas Aston 29 

Codman, Richard 28 

Codman, Rev. John 28 

Codman, John 28, 121 

Charles Stuart, King of Eng- 
land 29 

Copley, Mrs 29, 109, 109 



140 



Index 



PAGE 

Camperdown, Lord 29 

Cupid caressing Venus 30 

Children of George III 30 

Charles Prince and Son 30 

Crawford, Candace 31 

Chatham, Death of 34 

Copley, John Singleton . . . 103, 109 

Cooper, Rev. Samuel 106,110 

Copley Family 35, 109 

Cranston, Hon. Thomas 133 

Cranston, Mrs. Thomas 134 

Cranston, Miss Rhoda 134 

Dana, Richard 32 

Dana, Rev. Edmund 32 

Derby, Mrs 34 

DeBlois, Gilbert 33 

Delisle, Mrs. Lanfrey ^ 

Dumaresq, Rebecca 31 

Duchenhausen, Colonel 34 

De La Motte, Major-Gen. ... 34 

Deas, Mrs. and Children 34 

Dongan, Thos 104 

Dongan, Mrs. Thos 104 

Dawes, Mrs. Mehitable May . 104 

Dawes, Judge Thomas 121 

Duane, Judge 121 

Davis, Mrs. Anstice 123 

De Mountfort, Dr 108 

JQudley, Viscount 135 

Duncan, Lord 135, 135 

Eliot, Josiah 108 . 

Ellery, Mrs. Nathaniel 108 

Erving, James 120 

Erving, Hon. John 120 

Erskine, Lady 120 

Fort, Mrs 35 

Fitch, Colonel 35 

Fitch, Timothy 36 

Fitch, Mrs. Timothy 36 

Forbes, Mrs. Dorothy 37 

Fauccnberg, Lord 36 

Fluker, Thomas 37 

Fowle 38 

Folger, Timothy 38 

Fortune Teller 38 

Fayerweather, Dr 107 

Franklin, Gov 119 

Fleet, Thomas 120 



PAGE 

Foster, Dr. Isaac, Jr 122 

Foster, Capt. Isaac 122 

Foster, Mrs. Isaac 123 

Foster, Dr. William 123 

Gerrish, Benjamin 38 

Gill, Mrs. Relief Dowse 39 

Gill, Gov. Moses 39 

Gill, Mrs. Sarah Prince 40 

Gill, Mrs. Rebecca Boylston 

Gore 42 

George IV 43 

Gray, John 43 

Gray, Harrison 43 

Graham, Sir Robert 43 

Green 44 

Green, Mrs. 44 

Greene, Elizabeth Clarke 42 

Greene, Lieut. Francis 44 

Greene, Thomas -44 

Greene, Mrs. Thomas 45 

Greene, Thomas and his wife . 46 

Greene, Joseph 46 

Greene, Mrs. Joseph 46 

Greene, Gardiner 47 

Greene, Mrs. Gardiner 47, 47 

Greene, Gardiner and Mrs. 

Murray 43 

Greene, Benjamin 48 

Green, Councilor Joseph 48 

Green, Joseph 49 

Green, Mrs. Joseph 49 

Gardiner, John 50 

Greenleaf, Rev. Daniel . . . 50 

Greaton, General 50 

Gerfrish 103 

Gardiner, Dr. Sylvester 106 

Goldthwait, Major Thomas .. 112 

Goldthwait, Major Joseph ... 113 

Goldthwait, Ezekiel 113 

Goldthwait, Mrs. Ezekiel 113 

Greene, Rufus 113 

Greene, Mrs. Rufus 113 

Greenwood, Mrs. Samuel .... 119 

Hancock, John 51 

Hancock, Thomas 52, 53, 53 

Hancock, Mrs. Thomas 53, 53 

Hill, Henry 51 

Hill, Mrs. Henry 51 

Hall, Miss 52 



Index 



141 



PAGE 

Hall, Hugh 52 

Hallowell, Benjamin ^52 

Henshaw, Joshua 53 

Henshaw, Joseph 54 

Henshaw, Sarah 54 

Holmes, John B 54 

Holmes, William 55 

Holmes, Mrs. Isaac 55 

Hay, Mrs. John 57 

Hubbard, Thomas 57 

Hubbard, Miss Thankful 57 

Hutchinson, Thomas 55 

Heathfield, Lord 55 

Hutchinson, Mrs. Thomas ... 56 

Howard, Judge Martin 56 

Hugo, Col. and Col. Schleppen- 

gull X .-.. 56 

Holyoke, Edward 58 

Hurd, Nathaniel 58 

Hubbard, Daniel 59 

Hubbard, Mrs. Daniel 59 

Hooper, Alice 114 

Hixon, Joseph Sayer 118 

Hixon, Mrs. Joseph 119 

Hill, Mr 119 

Hill, Mrs 119 

Howe, Lord 135 

Hagar and Ishmael 136 

Hooper, Robert 59 

Hooper, Mrs. Robert 60 

Hooper, Mr 60 

Hooper, Mrs 60 

Hyatt, General 106 

Inman, Mrs. Elizabeth 60 

Inches, Mrs 61 

Izard, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph . . 61 

Ingersoll, Jarrett 103 

Jephson, Mrs 61 

Johnstone, Benjamin 62 

Jackson, Rev. Joseph 62 

Jones, William 62 

Jackson, Jonathan 72, 72, 72, 72, 73 

Jackson, Mrs. Jonathan 73 

Langdon, Judge Woodbury . . 62 
Langdon, Mrs. Judge Wood- 
bury 63 

Lemmon, Dr. Joseph 63 

Lyndhurst, Lord 64 



PAGE 

Lowell, Judge John 70 

Lewis, Thomas 70 

Lee, Col. Jeremiah 70 

Lee, Mrs. Jeremiah 71 

Laurens, Henry 71 

Lyde, Capt 118 

Livermore, Mrs. Judge 118 

Loring, Hannah 134 

Merchant, William 65 

Marchant, Judge Henry 65 

Mayhew, Rev. Jonathan 65 

Mayhew, Mrs. Jonathan 66 

Murray, Hon. James 66 

Murray, Mrs. John 67 

Murray, Col. John 67 

Murray, Mrs. John 67, 68 

Mifflin, Samuel 68 

Mifflin, Mrs. Samuel 68 

Macphreadis, Mrs 68 

Marston, Judge Nymphus 69 

Marshal, Col. Thomas 69 

Marshall, Mrs. Thomas 69 

McW T horter, Dr. Alexander ... 73 

McWhorter, Mrs. Alexander . 73 
Montague, Mrs. and Robert 

Copley 73 

Mansfield, Lord 74 

'Mars, Venus and Vulcan 74 

May, Col. Joseph 74 

Marryat, Mrs 117 

Mann, Thomas 118 

Mann, Mrs. Thomas 118 

Monmouth before James II . . 136 

Neptune 74 

Newton, John 75 

Northampton, Lord and Son . 75 

Nativity, The 135 

Negro, Head of 136 

Otis, Mary 75 

Ogilvie, Dr 76 

Oliver, Daniel 76 

Oliver, Hon. Andrew, Jr 76 

Oliver, Lieut. -Gov 77 

Oliver, Chief Justice Peter ... 76 

Oliver 76 

Offer of the Crown to Lady 

Grey 77 



142 



Index 



PAGE 

Pelham, Henry 77 

Pepperell, Sir William 77 

Pickman, Col. Benjamin 78 

Pickman, Mrs. Benjamin 78 

Powell, Mrs. Anna Dummer . . 79 

Parsons, Rev. Jonathan 79 

Pierpont 79 

Perkins, Mrs. Edmund 80 

Pelham, Henry 80 

Pierson, Death of Major 34 

Pelham, Charles 81 

Pringle, Mrs 81 

Pepperell, William and his 

Sister 81 

Paxtell, Mrs. William 105 

Quincy, Samuel 82 

Quincy, Mrs. Samuel 82 

Quincy, Josiah 82 

Rogers, Mrs. Daniel 83 

Rogers, Mrs. Abigail 84 

Rogers 85 

Rogers, Mrs. Lucy 84 

Russell, Judge Chambers 84 

Richards, John 85 

Red Cross Knight 85 

Russell, Mrs. Katherine 86 

Revere, Paul 86 

Richards, Mrs. Eliza Whiting . 87 

Rea, Mrs. Daniel 86 

Randolph, Suzanne 104 

Rogers, John 117 

Resurrection, The 135 

Sargent, Col. Epes, Sr 87 

Sargent, Epes, Jr 88 

Sargent, Mrs. Epes, Jr 89 

Sparhawk, Col. Nathaniel . . .96, 97 

Sparhawk, Mrs. Nathaniel ... 97 

Sigourney, Andrew 97 

Sigourney, Mrs. Andrew 97 

Stevens, Mrs. Elizabeth 90 

Sidmouth, Earl of 90 

Startin, Mrs 90 

Smith, Mrs. W. S 91 

Saltonstall, Judge Richard ... 91 

Smelt, Mrs 92 

Savage, Samuel Phillips 92 

Savage, Mrs. Samuel 92 

Spencer, Lord 92 



PAGE 

Scott, Gov. George 92 

Scott, Mrs. George 93 

Surrender of Admiral De Win- 
ter 93 

St. Jerome 93 

Seige of Gibraltar 94 

Samuel and Eli 94 

Storer, Ebenezer 94 

Storer, Ebenezer 94 

Storer, Mrs. Mary 94 

Storer, Mrs. Mary Edwards . 95 

Stevens, Mrs. Robert 95 

Skinner, Mrs 95 

Smith, Isaac 95 

Smith, Elizabeth Storer 96 

Spooner, Mrs. George 96 

Sheafe, Sir Roger 98 

Scollay, John 98 

Scollay, Mrs. John 98 

Scott, Mrs. Dorothy Quincy . 99 

Scott, Col. Olney 99 

Scott, Mrs. Olney 99 

Stillman, Rev. Mr 116 

Stillman, Mrs 116 

Smith, Mrs 117 

Sears, David 117 

Tyng, Eleazer 99 

Thacher, Oxenbridge 100 

Thacher, Mrs. Oxenbridge . . 100 

Temple, Sir John 100 

Temple, Lady 100 

Torrey, Mrs. Samuel 114 

Treadwell, Madam 114 

Tyler, Mrs. Andrew 115 

Tapestry 115 

Turner, William and Child ... 116 

Turner, Thomas 116 

Turner, Mrs. Peter 116 

Turner, Peter and Son 116 

Turner, Captain William 132 

Turner, Mrs. William 133 

Turner, Mary 133 

Tribute Money 135 

Verplanck, Mrs. Gulian 10 1 

Verplanck, Samuel 10 1 

Verplanck, Hon. Daniel Crom- 

melin 101 

Vans, William 115 

Vans, Mrs. William 115 



Index 



143 



PAGE 

Vose, Mrs. Eliza 132 

Vinal, Mrs. Judge 132 

Virgin and Child 136 

Winthrop, Mrs. John 10 1 

Winthrop, Samuel 103 

Wentworth, Sir John 102 

Western Family 102 

Winslow, Anna Green 102 

Warren, Joseph 131, 131 

Warren, Mrs. Joseph 105 

Walter, Mrs. William 106 

Winthrop, Prof. John 123 

Welsteed, Rev. William 115 

Whitworth, Dr 115 

Winslow, Joshua 124 

Wibird, Hon. Richard 124 

Whipple, Mrs. Oliver 124 



PAGE 

Whipple, Catherine 125 

Wentworth, Lady 125 

Watts, Mary 125 

Watson, Elkanah 126 

Watson, Col. George 127 

Watson, Mrs. George 127 

Watts, Mrs. Samuel 126 

Watson and the Shark 128 

Warner, Mary 128 

Warner, Mrs. Jonathan 128 

Wait, Daniel 129 

Washington, Gen. George ... 129 

W'arren, Winslow 129 

Warren, Mrs. Mercy Otis ... 129 

Warren, Gen. James 130 

Waldo, Mrs. Col. Samuel 131 

Weston, Lord and Brother 135 




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